Limits...
Locating a mitochondrial scaffold on the map

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

ABSTRACT

A high-density genetic interaction map reveals a complex that organizes the mitochondrial inner membrane.

No MeSH data available.


FOCAL POINT A collaborative effort by researchers including (left to right) Suzanne Hoppins, Jodi Nunnari, Ann Cassidy-Stone, Sean Collins, Benedikt Westermann, Eric Hummel, Maya Schuldiner, and Jonathan Weissman resulted in the assembly of MITO-MAP, a systems-wide view of the interactions between yeast genes involved in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function. The map revealed the existence of a protein complex called MitOS that forms an extended scaffold-like structure to organize the mitochondrial inner membrane. Compared to a wild-type mitochondrion (second from right), mitochondria from cells lacking MitOS components have a single, large, inner membrane crista that wraps around itself in the matrix to form an onion-like structure (far right).WEISSMAN PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL FETTERS; OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE AUTHORS
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198164&req=5

fig1: FOCAL POINT A collaborative effort by researchers including (left to right) Suzanne Hoppins, Jodi Nunnari, Ann Cassidy-Stone, Sean Collins, Benedikt Westermann, Eric Hummel, Maya Schuldiner, and Jonathan Weissman resulted in the assembly of MITO-MAP, a systems-wide view of the interactions between yeast genes involved in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function. The map revealed the existence of a protein complex called MitOS that forms an extended scaffold-like structure to organize the mitochondrial inner membrane. Compared to a wild-type mitochondrion (second from right), mitochondria from cells lacking MitOS components have a single, large, inner membrane crista that wraps around itself in the matrix to form an onion-like structure (far right).WEISSMAN PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL FETTERS; OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE AUTHORS


Locating a mitochondrial scaffold on the map
FOCAL POINT A collaborative effort by researchers including (left to right) Suzanne Hoppins, Jodi Nunnari, Ann Cassidy-Stone, Sean Collins, Benedikt Westermann, Eric Hummel, Maya Schuldiner, and Jonathan Weissman resulted in the assembly of MITO-MAP, a systems-wide view of the interactions between yeast genes involved in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function. The map revealed the existence of a protein complex called MitOS that forms an extended scaffold-like structure to organize the mitochondrial inner membrane. Compared to a wild-type mitochondrion (second from right), mitochondria from cells lacking MitOS components have a single, large, inner membrane crista that wraps around itself in the matrix to form an onion-like structure (far right).WEISSMAN PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL FETTERS; OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE AUTHORS
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198164&req=5

fig1: FOCAL POINT A collaborative effort by researchers including (left to right) Suzanne Hoppins, Jodi Nunnari, Ann Cassidy-Stone, Sean Collins, Benedikt Westermann, Eric Hummel, Maya Schuldiner, and Jonathan Weissman resulted in the assembly of MITO-MAP, a systems-wide view of the interactions between yeast genes involved in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function. The map revealed the existence of a protein complex called MitOS that forms an extended scaffold-like structure to organize the mitochondrial inner membrane. Compared to a wild-type mitochondrion (second from right), mitochondria from cells lacking MitOS components have a single, large, inner membrane crista that wraps around itself in the matrix to form an onion-like structure (far right).WEISSMAN PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL FETTERS; OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE AUTHORS

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

ABSTRACT

A high-density genetic interaction map reveals a complex that organizes the mitochondrial inner membrane.

No MeSH data available.