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Similar VLDL-TG storage in visceral and subcutaneous fat in obese and lean women.

Søndergaard E, Nellemann B, Sørensen LP, Gormsen LC, Christiansen JS, Ernst E, Dueholm M, Nielsen S - Diabetes (2011)

Bottom Line: Excess visceral fat accumulation is associated with the metabolic disturbances of obesity.A significantly larger proportion of VLDL-TG turnover was stored in UBSQ (~5%) and LBSQ (~4%) fat.The VLDL-TG fractional storage was similar in UBO and lean women for all regional depots.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Excess visceral fat accumulation is associated with the metabolic disturbances of obesity. Differential lipid redistribution through lipoproteins may affect body fat distribution. This is the first study to investigate VLDL-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) storage in visceral fat.

Research design and methods: Nine upper-body obese (UBO; waist circumference >88 cm) and six lean (waist circumference <80 cm) women scheduled for elective tubal ligation surgery were studied. VLDL-TG storage in visceral, upper-body subcutaneous (UBSQ), and lower-body subcutaneous (LBSQ) fat were measured with [9,10-(3)H]-triolein-labeled VLDL.

Results: VLDL-TG storage in visceral fat accounted for only ~0.8% of VLDL-TG turnover in UBO and lean women, respectively. A significantly larger proportion of VLDL-TG turnover was stored in UBSQ (~5%) and LBSQ (~4%) fat. The VLDL-TG fractional storage was similar in UBO and lean women for all regional depots. VLDL-TG fractional storage and VLDL-TG concentration were correlated in UBO women in UBSQ fat (r = 0.68, P = 0.04), whereas an inverse association was observed for lean women in visceral (r = -0.89, P = 0.02) and LBSQ (r = -0.87, P = 0.02) fat.

Conclusions: VLDL-TG storage efficiency is similar in all regional fat depots, and trafficking of VLDL-TG into different adipose tissue depots is similar in UBO and lean women. Postabsorptive VLDL-TG storage is unlikely to be of major importance in the development of preferential upper-body fat distribution in obese women.

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A: VLDL-TG fractional storage in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. B: VLDL-TG storage rate in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. C: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per kilogram lipid in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. D: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per 106 fat cells in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. Error bars are SEM. *P < 0.05 compared with visceral fat within group. †P < 0.05 between UBO and lean women.
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Figure 2: A: VLDL-TG fractional storage in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. B: VLDL-TG storage rate in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. C: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per kilogram lipid in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. D: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per 106 fat cells in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. Error bars are SEM. *P < 0.05 compared with visceral fat within group. †P < 0.05 between UBO and lean women.

Mentions: To explore the possibility of adipose tissue sample contamination by residual activity from plasma (20), residual plasma activity was plotted against activity in adipose tissue samples (dpm/g). No sign of a relationship was detected in any of the regional depots. VLDL-TG fractional storage was equivalent in UBO and lean women in each of the regional depots (visceral fat: 0.76 ± 0.48 vs. 0.81 ± 0.60%, not significant; UBSQ fat: 4.4 ± 2.9 vs. 5.7 ± 4.7%, not significant; LBSQ fat: 4.8 ± 2.8 vs. 3.9 ± 1.0%, not significant) (Fig. 2A). VLDL-TG storage rates in each of the different regional fat depots were also equivalent in UBO and lean women (visceral fat: 0.42 ± 0.29 vs. 0.35 ± 0.23 μmol/min, not significant; UBSQ fat: 2.3 ± 1.5 vs. 2.7 ± 2.7 μmol/min, not significant; LBSQ fat: 2.7 ± 1.9 vs. 1.8 ± 0.7 μmol/min, not significant) (Fig. 2B). As expected, because of lower visceral fat depot size, both fractional storage and storage rates were significantly lower in visceral fat compared with both LBSQ and UBSQ fat for both UBO and lean women (all P < 0.05).


Similar VLDL-TG storage in visceral and subcutaneous fat in obese and lean women.

Søndergaard E, Nellemann B, Sørensen LP, Gormsen LC, Christiansen JS, Ernst E, Dueholm M, Nielsen S - Diabetes (2011)

A: VLDL-TG fractional storage in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. B: VLDL-TG storage rate in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. C: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per kilogram lipid in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. D: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per 106 fat cells in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. Error bars are SEM. *P < 0.05 compared with visceral fat within group. †P < 0.05 between UBO and lean women.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198059&req=5

Figure 2: A: VLDL-TG fractional storage in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. B: VLDL-TG storage rate in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. C: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per kilogram lipid in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. D: Fractional VLDL-TG storage per 106 fat cells in visceral, UBSQ, and LBSQ fat. Error bars are SEM. *P < 0.05 compared with visceral fat within group. †P < 0.05 between UBO and lean women.
Mentions: To explore the possibility of adipose tissue sample contamination by residual activity from plasma (20), residual plasma activity was plotted against activity in adipose tissue samples (dpm/g). No sign of a relationship was detected in any of the regional depots. VLDL-TG fractional storage was equivalent in UBO and lean women in each of the regional depots (visceral fat: 0.76 ± 0.48 vs. 0.81 ± 0.60%, not significant; UBSQ fat: 4.4 ± 2.9 vs. 5.7 ± 4.7%, not significant; LBSQ fat: 4.8 ± 2.8 vs. 3.9 ± 1.0%, not significant) (Fig. 2A). VLDL-TG storage rates in each of the different regional fat depots were also equivalent in UBO and lean women (visceral fat: 0.42 ± 0.29 vs. 0.35 ± 0.23 μmol/min, not significant; UBSQ fat: 2.3 ± 1.5 vs. 2.7 ± 2.7 μmol/min, not significant; LBSQ fat: 2.7 ± 1.9 vs. 1.8 ± 0.7 μmol/min, not significant) (Fig. 2B). As expected, because of lower visceral fat depot size, both fractional storage and storage rates were significantly lower in visceral fat compared with both LBSQ and UBSQ fat for both UBO and lean women (all P < 0.05).

Bottom Line: Excess visceral fat accumulation is associated with the metabolic disturbances of obesity.A significantly larger proportion of VLDL-TG turnover was stored in UBSQ (~5%) and LBSQ (~4%) fat.The VLDL-TG fractional storage was similar in UBO and lean women for all regional depots.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Excess visceral fat accumulation is associated with the metabolic disturbances of obesity. Differential lipid redistribution through lipoproteins may affect body fat distribution. This is the first study to investigate VLDL-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) storage in visceral fat.

Research design and methods: Nine upper-body obese (UBO; waist circumference >88 cm) and six lean (waist circumference <80 cm) women scheduled for elective tubal ligation surgery were studied. VLDL-TG storage in visceral, upper-body subcutaneous (UBSQ), and lower-body subcutaneous (LBSQ) fat were measured with [9,10-(3)H]-triolein-labeled VLDL.

Results: VLDL-TG storage in visceral fat accounted for only ~0.8% of VLDL-TG turnover in UBO and lean women, respectively. A significantly larger proportion of VLDL-TG turnover was stored in UBSQ (~5%) and LBSQ (~4%) fat. The VLDL-TG fractional storage was similar in UBO and lean women for all regional depots. VLDL-TG fractional storage and VLDL-TG concentration were correlated in UBO women in UBSQ fat (r = 0.68, P = 0.04), whereas an inverse association was observed for lean women in visceral (r = -0.89, P = 0.02) and LBSQ (r = -0.87, P = 0.02) fat.

Conclusions: VLDL-TG storage efficiency is similar in all regional fat depots, and trafficking of VLDL-TG into different adipose tissue depots is similar in UBO and lean women. Postabsorptive VLDL-TG storage is unlikely to be of major importance in the development of preferential upper-body fat distribution in obese women.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus