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Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impact of caffeine.

Persad LA - Front Neurosci (2011)

Bottom Line: It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean.Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use.With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University of Pretoria Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Non-degraded stimulus.
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Figure 2: Non-degraded stimulus.

Mentions: Perception is a process of gaining some form of knowledge through thought, experience, and the senses (Wang, 2009). Lorist and Tops (2003) used a task consisting of a stimulus quality which was manipulated. The non-degraded stimulus consisted of a dot pattern surrounded by a rectangular frame of dots (see Figure 2). In the degraded condition dots were placed from the frame into variable positions. This new arrangement impaired the identification of the stimulus. Caffeine increased the ability to process degraded stimuli (see Figure 3; Lorist and Tops, 2003). By contrast, Smith (2002) conducted a perceptual task requiring participants to discriminate between two targets per trial. The group that received caffeine showed no significant difference in the perceptual task compared to those that did not receive caffeine. Another study conducted by Ruijter et al. (2000) tested the effect of caffeine on sustained attention required by subjects to work continuously for 10 min in a self-paced task. The task consisted of a color selection task, a spatial selection task, and a concentration task. Subjects were administered a moderate dose of 250 mg of caffeine. The results showed an increase in arousal but no change in perceptual behavior. From this we can see that the effect of caffeine on perception is inconsistent.


Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impact of caffeine.

Persad LA - Front Neurosci (2011)

Non-degraded stimulus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198027&req=5

Figure 2: Non-degraded stimulus.
Mentions: Perception is a process of gaining some form of knowledge through thought, experience, and the senses (Wang, 2009). Lorist and Tops (2003) used a task consisting of a stimulus quality which was manipulated. The non-degraded stimulus consisted of a dot pattern surrounded by a rectangular frame of dots (see Figure 2). In the degraded condition dots were placed from the frame into variable positions. This new arrangement impaired the identification of the stimulus. Caffeine increased the ability to process degraded stimuli (see Figure 3; Lorist and Tops, 2003). By contrast, Smith (2002) conducted a perceptual task requiring participants to discriminate between two targets per trial. The group that received caffeine showed no significant difference in the perceptual task compared to those that did not receive caffeine. Another study conducted by Ruijter et al. (2000) tested the effect of caffeine on sustained attention required by subjects to work continuously for 10 min in a self-paced task. The task consisted of a color selection task, a spatial selection task, and a concentration task. Subjects were administered a moderate dose of 250 mg of caffeine. The results showed an increase in arousal but no change in perceptual behavior. From this we can see that the effect of caffeine on perception is inconsistent.

Bottom Line: It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean.Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use.With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University of Pretoria Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus