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Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impact of caffeine.

Persad LA - Front Neurosci (2011)

Bottom Line: It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean.Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use.With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University of Pretoria Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of caffeine (Deng et al., 2008).
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Figure 1: Chemical structure of caffeine (Deng et al., 2008).

Mentions: Caffeine has a chemical structure of is 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine (Figure 1). Methylxanthine has a similar structure to purines, adenosine, xanthine, and uric acid (Chou, 1992).


Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impact of caffeine.

Persad LA - Front Neurosci (2011)

Chemical structure of caffeine (Deng et al., 2008).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3198027&req=5

Figure 1: Chemical structure of caffeine (Deng et al., 2008).
Mentions: Caffeine has a chemical structure of is 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine (Figure 1). Methylxanthine has a similar structure to purines, adenosine, xanthine, and uric acid (Chou, 1992).

Bottom Line: It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean.Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use.With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University of Pretoria Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus