Limits...
Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: seeking a roadmap toward a better understanding.

Cilia R, van Eimeren T - Brain Struct Funct (2011)

Bottom Line: It is safe to say that dopaminergic drugs, particularly dopamine agonists, are able to induce ICDs only in a minority of patients, while the majority are somehow protected from this adverse effect.Future prospects include potential add-on medications and the possible identification of genetic predispositions at a genome-wide scale.Functional imaging of pharmacogenetic interactions (imaging pharmacogenomics) may be an important tool on that road.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Parkinson Institute, Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, via Bignami 1, 20126 Milan, Italy. roberto.cilia@gmail.com

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of the most frequent impulse control disorders (ICDs) in PD patients on dopamine agonists (DAA) according to the DOMINION study (Weintraub et al. 2010). From left to right: compulsive shopping, pathological gambling, binge eating and hypersexuality
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3197927&req=5

Fig1: Prevalence of the most frequent impulse control disorders (ICDs) in PD patients on dopamine agonists (DAA) according to the DOMINION study (Weintraub et al. 2010). From left to right: compulsive shopping, pathological gambling, binge eating and hypersexuality

Mentions: Apart from unusual manifestations of ICDs (Bienfait et al. 2010; Bonfanti and Gatto 2010; Odiyoor et al. 2009; Pinggera et al. 2009), pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, binge eating and hypersexuality seem to be equally common in DAA-medicated PD (Fig. 1). However, men seem to be more prone to develop pathological gambling or hypersexuality, while women have higher rates of compulsive shopping and binge eating. It is yet unclear how much of these differences may stem from differences in the mesocorticolimbic reward system (Hoeft et al. 2008; Munro et al. 2006) or reporting biases due to social acceptance.Fig. 1


Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: seeking a roadmap toward a better understanding.

Cilia R, van Eimeren T - Brain Struct Funct (2011)

Prevalence of the most frequent impulse control disorders (ICDs) in PD patients on dopamine agonists (DAA) according to the DOMINION study (Weintraub et al. 2010). From left to right: compulsive shopping, pathological gambling, binge eating and hypersexuality
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3197927&req=5

Fig1: Prevalence of the most frequent impulse control disorders (ICDs) in PD patients on dopamine agonists (DAA) according to the DOMINION study (Weintraub et al. 2010). From left to right: compulsive shopping, pathological gambling, binge eating and hypersexuality
Mentions: Apart from unusual manifestations of ICDs (Bienfait et al. 2010; Bonfanti and Gatto 2010; Odiyoor et al. 2009; Pinggera et al. 2009), pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, binge eating and hypersexuality seem to be equally common in DAA-medicated PD (Fig. 1). However, men seem to be more prone to develop pathological gambling or hypersexuality, while women have higher rates of compulsive shopping and binge eating. It is yet unclear how much of these differences may stem from differences in the mesocorticolimbic reward system (Hoeft et al. 2008; Munro et al. 2006) or reporting biases due to social acceptance.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: It is safe to say that dopaminergic drugs, particularly dopamine agonists, are able to induce ICDs only in a minority of patients, while the majority are somehow protected from this adverse effect.Future prospects include potential add-on medications and the possible identification of genetic predispositions at a genome-wide scale.Functional imaging of pharmacogenetic interactions (imaging pharmacogenomics) may be an important tool on that road.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Parkinson Institute, Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, via Bignami 1, 20126 Milan, Italy. roberto.cilia@gmail.com

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus