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Hippocampal pyramidal cells: the reemergence of cortical lamination.

Slomianka L, Amrein I, Knuesel I, Sørensen JC, Wolfer DP - Brain Struct Funct (2011)

Bottom Line: Distributions of deep and superficial pyramidal cell dendrites and studies in reeler or sparsely GFP-expressing mice indicate that this also applies to afferent pathways.Histological, neurochemical, and connective differences between deep and superficial neurons may correlate with (patho-) physiological phenomena specific to pyramidal cells at different radial locations.We feel that an appreciation of radial subdivisions in the pyramidal cell layer reminiscent of lamination in other cortical areas may be critical in the interpretation of studies of hippocampal anatomy and function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, University of Zürich, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland. slomianka@anatom.uzh.ch

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a Hippocampus of a mouse carrying the Relnorl reelin mutation. b Two distinct cell layers and deep cell clusters in the septal mid-proximodistal CA1 of a Relnorl mouse. c At more temporal levels packing densities and cell sizes in the two CA1 layers resemble those in normal laboratory mice. d CA1 pyramidal cells in Relnorl mouse retain their neurochemical identity with regard to calbindin, with only the younger, now deep pyramids showing moderate calbindin immunoreactivity. e The two CA1 layers of Relnorl mice do not show appreciable differences in their parvalbumin immunoreactivity. f Zbtb20 (green) in C57Bl/6 mouse superficial pyramidal cells and Sox5 (red) in deep pyramidal cells. g Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the Chincilla do not receive mossy fiber input close to their soma. h Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the fox. Scalebarsa 0.5 mm, b–h 50 μm. The original of f was kindly provided by Prof. Niels A. Jensen (Nielsen et al. 2010, with permission of Oxford University Press)
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Fig3: a Hippocampus of a mouse carrying the Relnorl reelin mutation. b Two distinct cell layers and deep cell clusters in the septal mid-proximodistal CA1 of a Relnorl mouse. c At more temporal levels packing densities and cell sizes in the two CA1 layers resemble those in normal laboratory mice. d CA1 pyramidal cells in Relnorl mouse retain their neurochemical identity with regard to calbindin, with only the younger, now deep pyramids showing moderate calbindin immunoreactivity. e The two CA1 layers of Relnorl mice do not show appreciable differences in their parvalbumin immunoreactivity. f Zbtb20 (green) in C57Bl/6 mouse superficial pyramidal cells and Sox5 (red) in deep pyramidal cells. g Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the Chincilla do not receive mossy fiber input close to their soma. h Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the fox. Scalebarsa 0.5 mm, b–h 50 μm. The original of f was kindly provided by Prof. Niels A. Jensen (Nielsen et al. 2010, with permission of Oxford University Press)

Mentions: Morphological differences between cells at different radial locations in the pyramidal cell layer and the maintenance of spatial relations according to neuronal birthdays may still be accommodated within the idea that the pyramidal cells are a radially homogeneous population of neurons. However, a migration defect in reeler mice does not result in a simple “inside-out” to “outside-in” reversal. Neither does this mutation result in the random scattering of cells that is observed for the dentate granule cells. Instead pyramidal cells are sorted, according to their time of generation, into two, more or less distinct, sublayers (Fig. 3a–e; Caviness 1973; Stanfield and Cowan 1979a, b; Deller et al. 1999; Coulin et al. 2001). Early born cells concentrate in a layer close to the alveus. This layer is separated by a cell-sparse zone from a layer formed by lately born cells closer to the obliterated hippocampal fissure.Fig. 3


Hippocampal pyramidal cells: the reemergence of cortical lamination.

Slomianka L, Amrein I, Knuesel I, Sørensen JC, Wolfer DP - Brain Struct Funct (2011)

a Hippocampus of a mouse carrying the Relnorl reelin mutation. b Two distinct cell layers and deep cell clusters in the septal mid-proximodistal CA1 of a Relnorl mouse. c At more temporal levels packing densities and cell sizes in the two CA1 layers resemble those in normal laboratory mice. d CA1 pyramidal cells in Relnorl mouse retain their neurochemical identity with regard to calbindin, with only the younger, now deep pyramids showing moderate calbindin immunoreactivity. e The two CA1 layers of Relnorl mice do not show appreciable differences in their parvalbumin immunoreactivity. f Zbtb20 (green) in C57Bl/6 mouse superficial pyramidal cells and Sox5 (red) in deep pyramidal cells. g Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the Chincilla do not receive mossy fiber input close to their soma. h Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the fox. Scalebarsa 0.5 mm, b–h 50 μm. The original of f was kindly provided by Prof. Niels A. Jensen (Nielsen et al. 2010, with permission of Oxford University Press)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3197924&req=5

Fig3: a Hippocampus of a mouse carrying the Relnorl reelin mutation. b Two distinct cell layers and deep cell clusters in the septal mid-proximodistal CA1 of a Relnorl mouse. c At more temporal levels packing densities and cell sizes in the two CA1 layers resemble those in normal laboratory mice. d CA1 pyramidal cells in Relnorl mouse retain their neurochemical identity with regard to calbindin, with only the younger, now deep pyramids showing moderate calbindin immunoreactivity. e The two CA1 layers of Relnorl mice do not show appreciable differences in their parvalbumin immunoreactivity. f Zbtb20 (green) in C57Bl/6 mouse superficial pyramidal cells and Sox5 (red) in deep pyramidal cells. g Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the Chincilla do not receive mossy fiber input close to their soma. h Scattered deep pyramidal cells in distal CA3 of the fox. Scalebarsa 0.5 mm, b–h 50 μm. The original of f was kindly provided by Prof. Niels A. Jensen (Nielsen et al. 2010, with permission of Oxford University Press)
Mentions: Morphological differences between cells at different radial locations in the pyramidal cell layer and the maintenance of spatial relations according to neuronal birthdays may still be accommodated within the idea that the pyramidal cells are a radially homogeneous population of neurons. However, a migration defect in reeler mice does not result in a simple “inside-out” to “outside-in” reversal. Neither does this mutation result in the random scattering of cells that is observed for the dentate granule cells. Instead pyramidal cells are sorted, according to their time of generation, into two, more or less distinct, sublayers (Fig. 3a–e; Caviness 1973; Stanfield and Cowan 1979a, b; Deller et al. 1999; Coulin et al. 2001). Early born cells concentrate in a layer close to the alveus. This layer is separated by a cell-sparse zone from a layer formed by lately born cells closer to the obliterated hippocampal fissure.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Distributions of deep and superficial pyramidal cell dendrites and studies in reeler or sparsely GFP-expressing mice indicate that this also applies to afferent pathways.Histological, neurochemical, and connective differences between deep and superficial neurons may correlate with (patho-) physiological phenomena specific to pyramidal cells at different radial locations.We feel that an appreciation of radial subdivisions in the pyramidal cell layer reminiscent of lamination in other cortical areas may be critical in the interpretation of studies of hippocampal anatomy and function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, University of Zürich, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland. slomianka@anatom.uzh.ch

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus