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Hippocampal pyramidal cells: the reemergence of cortical lamination.

Slomianka L, Amrein I, Knuesel I, Sørensen JC, Wolfer DP - Brain Struct Funct (2011)

Bottom Line: Distributions of deep and superficial pyramidal cell dendrites and studies in reeler or sparsely GFP-expressing mice indicate that this also applies to afferent pathways.Histological, neurochemical, and connective differences between deep and superficial neurons may correlate with (patho-) physiological phenomena specific to pyramidal cells at different radial locations.We feel that an appreciation of radial subdivisions in the pyramidal cell layer reminiscent of lamination in other cortical areas may be critical in the interpretation of studies of hippocampal anatomy and function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, University of Zürich, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland. slomianka@anatom.uzh.ch

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Illustration of the nomenclature used in this review. The top left inset shows the hippocampus of one hemisphere from which non-hippocampal tissue had been removed and illustrates the terms “septal” and “temporal”. The approximately mid-septotemporal location of the main image of a horizontal section is indicated in the top left inset by a line. The main image illustrates the terms “proximal” and “distal”. The proximal border of CA1 (more correctly CA1/2) towards CA3 and between distal CA1 and the subiculum is marked by arrowheads. The top right inset shows the pyramidal cells marked in the main image and illustrates the use of the terms “superficial” and “deep”. Scalebar 100 μm
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Fig1: Illustration of the nomenclature used in this review. The top left inset shows the hippocampus of one hemisphere from which non-hippocampal tissue had been removed and illustrates the terms “septal” and “temporal”. The approximately mid-septotemporal location of the main image of a horizontal section is indicated in the top left inset by a line. The main image illustrates the terms “proximal” and “distal”. The proximal border of CA1 (more correctly CA1/2) towards CA3 and between distal CA1 and the subiculum is marked by arrowheads. The top right inset shows the pyramidal cells marked in the main image and illustrates the use of the terms “superficial” and “deep”. Scalebar 100 μm

Mentions: We follow Ishizuka et al. (1990) and use the terms proximal (nearer the dentate gyrus) and distal (further away from the dentate gyrus) to designate positions along the transverse axis of the CA1 and CA3. The terms septal (closer, by way of the fimbria, to the septum) and temporal (further away from the septum) are used to designate positions along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. This nomenclature is independent of differences in position that accompany phylogenetic changes in the size and shape of the adjacent cortical areas. Molecular and connectional criteria have replaced the original definition of CA2 based on Golgi stains (Lein et al. 2005). With one exception (see Neurochemistry), we did not find evidence that would distinguish this field from CA1 as far as lamination is concerned, and it is here treated as the part of CA1. For the sake of simplicity, we use “CA1” throughout instead of the more correct “CA1/2”. Terms and definitions are illustrated in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Hippocampal pyramidal cells: the reemergence of cortical lamination.

Slomianka L, Amrein I, Knuesel I, Sørensen JC, Wolfer DP - Brain Struct Funct (2011)

Illustration of the nomenclature used in this review. The top left inset shows the hippocampus of one hemisphere from which non-hippocampal tissue had been removed and illustrates the terms “septal” and “temporal”. The approximately mid-septotemporal location of the main image of a horizontal section is indicated in the top left inset by a line. The main image illustrates the terms “proximal” and “distal”. The proximal border of CA1 (more correctly CA1/2) towards CA3 and between distal CA1 and the subiculum is marked by arrowheads. The top right inset shows the pyramidal cells marked in the main image and illustrates the use of the terms “superficial” and “deep”. Scalebar 100 μm
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3197924&req=5

Fig1: Illustration of the nomenclature used in this review. The top left inset shows the hippocampus of one hemisphere from which non-hippocampal tissue had been removed and illustrates the terms “septal” and “temporal”. The approximately mid-septotemporal location of the main image of a horizontal section is indicated in the top left inset by a line. The main image illustrates the terms “proximal” and “distal”. The proximal border of CA1 (more correctly CA1/2) towards CA3 and between distal CA1 and the subiculum is marked by arrowheads. The top right inset shows the pyramidal cells marked in the main image and illustrates the use of the terms “superficial” and “deep”. Scalebar 100 μm
Mentions: We follow Ishizuka et al. (1990) and use the terms proximal (nearer the dentate gyrus) and distal (further away from the dentate gyrus) to designate positions along the transverse axis of the CA1 and CA3. The terms septal (closer, by way of the fimbria, to the septum) and temporal (further away from the septum) are used to designate positions along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. This nomenclature is independent of differences in position that accompany phylogenetic changes in the size and shape of the adjacent cortical areas. Molecular and connectional criteria have replaced the original definition of CA2 based on Golgi stains (Lein et al. 2005). With one exception (see Neurochemistry), we did not find evidence that would distinguish this field from CA1 as far as lamination is concerned, and it is here treated as the part of CA1. For the sake of simplicity, we use “CA1” throughout instead of the more correct “CA1/2”. Terms and definitions are illustrated in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Distributions of deep and superficial pyramidal cell dendrites and studies in reeler or sparsely GFP-expressing mice indicate that this also applies to afferent pathways.Histological, neurochemical, and connective differences between deep and superficial neurons may correlate with (patho-) physiological phenomena specific to pyramidal cells at different radial locations.We feel that an appreciation of radial subdivisions in the pyramidal cell layer reminiscent of lamination in other cortical areas may be critical in the interpretation of studies of hippocampal anatomy and function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, University of Zürich, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland. slomianka@anatom.uzh.ch

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus