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Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

Jawa DS, Sircar K, Somani R, Grover N, Jaidka S, Singh S - J Oral Maxillofac Pathol (2009)

Bottom Line: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities.Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias.We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, D.J. College of Dental Sciences and Research, Niwari Road, Modinagar, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities. Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been reported from India. We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sebaceous cyst on the back
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Figure 2: Sebaceous cyst on the back

Mentions: His weight was 30 kg and height was 163 cm, which were normal for his age. Although the face was bilaterally symmetrical, the frontal view revealed flattening of the nasal bridge. Head circumference was 56 cm, whereas, the normal for a 13-year-old boy is 54 -57 cm.[4] Painless, soft fluctuant swellings 1 – 2 mm in size were found over the middle finger of the left hand [Figure 1] and 1 cm away from the midline over the dorsal spine region [Figure 2]. These swellings were present since birth. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) from these lesions reported them to be sebaceous cyst type lesions. Examination of extremities showed an accessory toe with syndactyly with the fifth digit of the right foot [Figure 3].


Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

Jawa DS, Sircar K, Somani R, Grover N, Jaidka S, Singh S - J Oral Maxillofac Pathol (2009)

Sebaceous cyst on the back
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3162868&req=5

Figure 2: Sebaceous cyst on the back
Mentions: His weight was 30 kg and height was 163 cm, which were normal for his age. Although the face was bilaterally symmetrical, the frontal view revealed flattening of the nasal bridge. Head circumference was 56 cm, whereas, the normal for a 13-year-old boy is 54 -57 cm.[4] Painless, soft fluctuant swellings 1 – 2 mm in size were found over the middle finger of the left hand [Figure 1] and 1 cm away from the midline over the dorsal spine region [Figure 2]. These swellings were present since birth. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) from these lesions reported them to be sebaceous cyst type lesions. Examination of extremities showed an accessory toe with syndactyly with the fifth digit of the right foot [Figure 3].

Bottom Line: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities.Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias.We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, D.J. College of Dental Sciences and Research, Niwari Road, Modinagar, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities. Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been reported from India. We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus