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Memory for emotional pictures in patients with Alzheimer's dementia: comparing picture-location binding and subsequent recognition.

Huijbers MJ, Bergmann HC, Olde Rikkert MG, Kessels RP - J Aging Res (2011)

Bottom Line: AD patients showed a benefit in immediate spatial memory for positive pictures, while healthy young and older participants did not benefit from emotional content.We conclude that AD patients may have a memory bias for positive information in spatial memory.Discrepancies between our findings and earlier studies are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Internal Post 966, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Emotional content typically facilitates subsequent memory, known as the emotional enhancement effect. We investigated whether emotional content facilitates spatial and item memory in patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Twenty-three AD patients, twenty-three healthy elderly, and twenty-three young adults performed a picture relocation task and a delayed recognition task with positive, negative, and neutral stimuli. AD patients showed a benefit in immediate spatial memory for positive pictures, while healthy young and older participants did not benefit from emotional content. No emotional enhancement effects on delayed item recognition were seen. We conclude that AD patients may have a memory bias for positive information in spatial memory. Discrepancies between our findings and earlier studies are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the picture relocation task.
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fig1: Schematic representation of the picture relocation task.

Mentions: For the picture relocation task, participants were seated in a comfortable chair, approximately 50 centimetres in front of a touch-sensitive screen (ELO AccuTouch 220, 21 inch) connected to a laptop (Compaq Presario V5000) containing Windows XP home edition. All pictures were presented using the Object Relocation software [38]. First, a 3 × 3 grid was presented (18 × 18 cm) on the computer screen, in which nine pictures (5.5 × 5.5 cm each) were presented sequentially for 1500 milliseconds in a random-generated order, with a total duration of 13,500 milliseconds (see Figure 1 for a schematic representation of the picture relocation task). We used a presentation duration of 1500 ms instead of 1000 ms, which was used by Mather and Nesmith [14], to take a possible age-related decline in information-processing speed in our older participant groups into account. One practice trial was presented with nine neutral pictures, and four experimental trials with three neutral, three positive, and three negative pictures. The pictures comprising each experimental trial had been randomized using computerized random generation, resulting in 12 versions of the task with different picture combinations (within the set of 36 pictures) across trials. Consequently, no more than four participants received the same version (two versions per group).


Memory for emotional pictures in patients with Alzheimer's dementia: comparing picture-location binding and subsequent recognition.

Huijbers MJ, Bergmann HC, Olde Rikkert MG, Kessels RP - J Aging Res (2011)

Schematic representation of the picture relocation task.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3142551&req=5

fig1: Schematic representation of the picture relocation task.
Mentions: For the picture relocation task, participants were seated in a comfortable chair, approximately 50 centimetres in front of a touch-sensitive screen (ELO AccuTouch 220, 21 inch) connected to a laptop (Compaq Presario V5000) containing Windows XP home edition. All pictures were presented using the Object Relocation software [38]. First, a 3 × 3 grid was presented (18 × 18 cm) on the computer screen, in which nine pictures (5.5 × 5.5 cm each) were presented sequentially for 1500 milliseconds in a random-generated order, with a total duration of 13,500 milliseconds (see Figure 1 for a schematic representation of the picture relocation task). We used a presentation duration of 1500 ms instead of 1000 ms, which was used by Mather and Nesmith [14], to take a possible age-related decline in information-processing speed in our older participant groups into account. One practice trial was presented with nine neutral pictures, and four experimental trials with three neutral, three positive, and three negative pictures. The pictures comprising each experimental trial had been randomized using computerized random generation, resulting in 12 versions of the task with different picture combinations (within the set of 36 pictures) across trials. Consequently, no more than four participants received the same version (two versions per group).

Bottom Line: AD patients showed a benefit in immediate spatial memory for positive pictures, while healthy young and older participants did not benefit from emotional content.We conclude that AD patients may have a memory bias for positive information in spatial memory.Discrepancies between our findings and earlier studies are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Internal Post 966, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Emotional content typically facilitates subsequent memory, known as the emotional enhancement effect. We investigated whether emotional content facilitates spatial and item memory in patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Twenty-three AD patients, twenty-three healthy elderly, and twenty-three young adults performed a picture relocation task and a delayed recognition task with positive, negative, and neutral stimuli. AD patients showed a benefit in immediate spatial memory for positive pictures, while healthy young and older participants did not benefit from emotional content. No emotional enhancement effects on delayed item recognition were seen. We conclude that AD patients may have a memory bias for positive information in spatial memory. Discrepancies between our findings and earlier studies are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus