Limits...
Tibial torus and toddler's fractures misdiagnosed as transient synovitis: a case series.

Seyahi A, Uludag S, Altıntaş B, Demirhan M - J Med Case Rep (2011)

Bottom Line: The high incidence of transient synovitis in early childhood makes it the first suspected pathology in a limping child.We report the cases of three Caucasian patients (two boys, aged 20-months- and three-years-old, and one girl, aged two-years-old), with tibial torus and toddler's fractures which were late-diagnosed due to an initial misdiagnosis of transient synovitis of the hip.In a non-cooperative child musculoskeletal trauma can be mistaken as a simple causative factor for transient synovitis of the hip and this can easily prevent further investigation for a possible subtle musculoskeletal injury of the lower extremities.Our experience with the presented cases suggests the need to be more vigilant in the differential diagnosis of transient synovitis in young children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: American Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Istanbul, Turkey. aseyahi@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The high incidence of transient synovitis in early childhood makes it the first suspected pathology in a limping child. Trauma, which has long been regarded as a causative factor for transient synovitis, may be underestimated in a non-cooperative toddler.After excluding most serious conditions, such as septic arthritis, a speculative diagnosis of transient synovitis can be made, and this can easily mask a subtle musculoskeletal injury.

Case presentations: We report the cases of three Caucasian patients (two boys, aged 20-months- and three-years-old, and one girl, aged two-years-old), with tibial torus and toddler's fractures which were late-diagnosed due to an initial misdiagnosis of transient synovitis of the hip.

Conclusion: In a non-cooperative child musculoskeletal trauma can be mistaken as a simple causative factor for transient synovitis of the hip and this can easily prevent further investigation for a possible subtle musculoskeletal injury of the lower extremities.Our experience with the presented cases suggests the need to be more vigilant in the differential diagnosis of transient synovitis in young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lower extremity radiograph showed periosteal new bone formation suggesting healing of a toddler's fracture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3142521&req=5

Figure 3: Lower extremity radiograph showed periosteal new bone formation suggesting healing of a toddler's fracture.

Mentions: She had a slight improvement of her symptoms in the first week. Two weeks after her initial visit, she was evaluated in our orthopedic outpatient clinic because of her persisting symptoms. There was local tenderness and swelling on her right leg and passive flexion and extension of the ankle was painful. A whole lower extremity radiograph showed peri-osteal new bone formation suggesting the healing of a toddler's fracture (Figure 3). The patient healed uneventfully after two additional weeks of immobilization and she had no complaint during her follow-up examination three months after her initial admission.


Tibial torus and toddler's fractures misdiagnosed as transient synovitis: a case series.

Seyahi A, Uludag S, Altıntaş B, Demirhan M - J Med Case Rep (2011)

Lower extremity radiograph showed periosteal new bone formation suggesting healing of a toddler's fracture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3142521&req=5

Figure 3: Lower extremity radiograph showed periosteal new bone formation suggesting healing of a toddler's fracture.
Mentions: She had a slight improvement of her symptoms in the first week. Two weeks after her initial visit, she was evaluated in our orthopedic outpatient clinic because of her persisting symptoms. There was local tenderness and swelling on her right leg and passive flexion and extension of the ankle was painful. A whole lower extremity radiograph showed peri-osteal new bone formation suggesting the healing of a toddler's fracture (Figure 3). The patient healed uneventfully after two additional weeks of immobilization and she had no complaint during her follow-up examination three months after her initial admission.

Bottom Line: The high incidence of transient synovitis in early childhood makes it the first suspected pathology in a limping child.We report the cases of three Caucasian patients (two boys, aged 20-months- and three-years-old, and one girl, aged two-years-old), with tibial torus and toddler's fractures which were late-diagnosed due to an initial misdiagnosis of transient synovitis of the hip.In a non-cooperative child musculoskeletal trauma can be mistaken as a simple causative factor for transient synovitis of the hip and this can easily prevent further investigation for a possible subtle musculoskeletal injury of the lower extremities.Our experience with the presented cases suggests the need to be more vigilant in the differential diagnosis of transient synovitis in young children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: American Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Istanbul, Turkey. aseyahi@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The high incidence of transient synovitis in early childhood makes it the first suspected pathology in a limping child. Trauma, which has long been regarded as a causative factor for transient synovitis, may be underestimated in a non-cooperative toddler.After excluding most serious conditions, such as septic arthritis, a speculative diagnosis of transient synovitis can be made, and this can easily mask a subtle musculoskeletal injury.

Case presentations: We report the cases of three Caucasian patients (two boys, aged 20-months- and three-years-old, and one girl, aged two-years-old), with tibial torus and toddler's fractures which were late-diagnosed due to an initial misdiagnosis of transient synovitis of the hip.

Conclusion: In a non-cooperative child musculoskeletal trauma can be mistaken as a simple causative factor for transient synovitis of the hip and this can easily prevent further investigation for a possible subtle musculoskeletal injury of the lower extremities.Our experience with the presented cases suggests the need to be more vigilant in the differential diagnosis of transient synovitis in young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus