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A progressive increase in cardiovascular risk assessed by coronary angiography in non-diabetic patients at sub-diabetic glucose levels.

Schinner S, Füth R, Kempf K, Martin S, Willenberg HS, Schott M, Dinh W, Scherbaum WA, Lankisch M - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2011)

Bottom Line: We found a continuous increase in the risk for CHD with fasting and post-challenge blood glucose values even in the subdiabetic range.The increase in risk for CHD reached statistical significance at FBG levels of > 120 mg/dl (Odds Ratio of 2.7 [1.3-5.6] and 2h-BG levels > 140 mg/dl (141-160 mg/dl OR 1.8 [1.1-2.9], which was however lost after adjusting for age, sex and BMI.In our study population we found a continuous increased risk for CHD at fasting and 2h-BG levels in the sub-diabetic glucose range, but no clear cut-off values for cardiovascular risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Rheumatology, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). While there is a clear correlation of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2 h post-challenge blood glucose values (2h-BG) with microvascular complications, the risk for CHD conferred by glucose dysregulation antecedent to DM2 is less clear. Therefore, we investigated associations of FBG and 2h-BG values with the prevalence of CHD assessed by coronary angiography as the most sensitive diagnostic tool.

Research design and methods: Coronary angiography was performed in 1394 patients without known DM. Capillary blood glucose was analyzed before and 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test. Associations between FBG as well as 2h-BG levels and the risk for CHD were assessed by logistic regression analysis.

Results: 1064 (75%) of patients were diagnosed with CHD. 204 (15%) were diagnosed with so far unknown DM2, 274 (20%) with isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 188 (13%) with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 282 (20%) with both, IGT and IFG. We found a continuous increase in the risk for CHD with fasting and post-challenge blood glucose values even in the subdiabetic range. This correlation did however not suggest clear cut-off values. The increase in risk for CHD reached statistical significance at FBG levels of > 120 mg/dl (Odds Ratio of 2.7 [1.3-5.6] and 2h-BG levels > 140 mg/dl (141-160 mg/dl OR 1.8 [1.1-2.9], which was however lost after adjusting for age, sex and BMI.

Conclusions: In our study population we found a continuous increased risk for CHD at fasting and 2h-BG levels in the sub-diabetic glucose range, but no clear cut-off values for cardiovascular risk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cumulative frequency of fasting and 2 h blood glucose values for patients with and without coronary heart disease. Cumulative frequencies of patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD) were plotted against blood glucose values in (A) fasting state and (B) 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test. Blood glucose ranges were divided into sextiles with the lowest sextile defined as reference group each. Shown are the numbers and percentages of patients as well as the odds ratios for CHD in the respective blood glucose sextiles.
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Figure 1: Cumulative frequency of fasting and 2 h blood glucose values for patients with and without coronary heart disease. Cumulative frequencies of patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD) were plotted against blood glucose values in (A) fasting state and (B) 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test. Blood glucose ranges were divided into sextiles with the lowest sextile defined as reference group each. Shown are the numbers and percentages of patients as well as the odds ratios for CHD in the respective blood glucose sextiles.

Mentions: Capillary blood glucose was determined in the fasting state and 2 h after an oGTT. The distribution of FBG levels among the patients was as followed: 435 (31%) were < 90 mg/dl (329 with CHD vs. 106 without CHD), 370 (26%) were in the range of 91-100 mg/dl (292 vs. 78), 164 (12%) were between 101-110 mg/dl (124 vs. 40), 76 (6%) were between 111-120 mg/dl (62 vs. 14) and 72 (5%) were > 120 mg/dl (63 vs. 9) (Figure 1A). Patients with FBG ≤80 mg/dl (n = 276 (20%); 200 vs. 76) were defined as the reference group. Compared to the reference group the risk for CHD increased continuously with FBG levels. Table 2 shows that statistical significance was reached at FBG levels > 120 mg/dl (OR 2.67 [1.3-5.6]) and remained significant after adjusting for sex and age but not in a separate model including the BMI. As seen in Table 3 when blood glucose was expressed as a continuous variable, both the fasting as well as the 2 h glucose values were significantly correlated with CHD risk.


A progressive increase in cardiovascular risk assessed by coronary angiography in non-diabetic patients at sub-diabetic glucose levels.

Schinner S, Füth R, Kempf K, Martin S, Willenberg HS, Schott M, Dinh W, Scherbaum WA, Lankisch M - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2011)

Cumulative frequency of fasting and 2 h blood glucose values for patients with and without coronary heart disease. Cumulative frequencies of patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD) were plotted against blood glucose values in (A) fasting state and (B) 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test. Blood glucose ranges were divided into sextiles with the lowest sextile defined as reference group each. Shown are the numbers and percentages of patients as well as the odds ratios for CHD in the respective blood glucose sextiles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3142488&req=5

Figure 1: Cumulative frequency of fasting and 2 h blood glucose values for patients with and without coronary heart disease. Cumulative frequencies of patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD) were plotted against blood glucose values in (A) fasting state and (B) 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test. Blood glucose ranges were divided into sextiles with the lowest sextile defined as reference group each. Shown are the numbers and percentages of patients as well as the odds ratios for CHD in the respective blood glucose sextiles.
Mentions: Capillary blood glucose was determined in the fasting state and 2 h after an oGTT. The distribution of FBG levels among the patients was as followed: 435 (31%) were < 90 mg/dl (329 with CHD vs. 106 without CHD), 370 (26%) were in the range of 91-100 mg/dl (292 vs. 78), 164 (12%) were between 101-110 mg/dl (124 vs. 40), 76 (6%) were between 111-120 mg/dl (62 vs. 14) and 72 (5%) were > 120 mg/dl (63 vs. 9) (Figure 1A). Patients with FBG ≤80 mg/dl (n = 276 (20%); 200 vs. 76) were defined as the reference group. Compared to the reference group the risk for CHD increased continuously with FBG levels. Table 2 shows that statistical significance was reached at FBG levels > 120 mg/dl (OR 2.67 [1.3-5.6]) and remained significant after adjusting for sex and age but not in a separate model including the BMI. As seen in Table 3 when blood glucose was expressed as a continuous variable, both the fasting as well as the 2 h glucose values were significantly correlated with CHD risk.

Bottom Line: We found a continuous increase in the risk for CHD with fasting and post-challenge blood glucose values even in the subdiabetic range.The increase in risk for CHD reached statistical significance at FBG levels of > 120 mg/dl (Odds Ratio of 2.7 [1.3-5.6] and 2h-BG levels > 140 mg/dl (141-160 mg/dl OR 1.8 [1.1-2.9], which was however lost after adjusting for age, sex and BMI.In our study population we found a continuous increased risk for CHD at fasting and 2h-BG levels in the sub-diabetic glucose range, but no clear cut-off values for cardiovascular risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Rheumatology, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). While there is a clear correlation of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2 h post-challenge blood glucose values (2h-BG) with microvascular complications, the risk for CHD conferred by glucose dysregulation antecedent to DM2 is less clear. Therefore, we investigated associations of FBG and 2h-BG values with the prevalence of CHD assessed by coronary angiography as the most sensitive diagnostic tool.

Research design and methods: Coronary angiography was performed in 1394 patients without known DM. Capillary blood glucose was analyzed before and 2 h after an oral glucose tolerance test. Associations between FBG as well as 2h-BG levels and the risk for CHD were assessed by logistic regression analysis.

Results: 1064 (75%) of patients were diagnosed with CHD. 204 (15%) were diagnosed with so far unknown DM2, 274 (20%) with isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 188 (13%) with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 282 (20%) with both, IGT and IFG. We found a continuous increase in the risk for CHD with fasting and post-challenge blood glucose values even in the subdiabetic range. This correlation did however not suggest clear cut-off values. The increase in risk for CHD reached statistical significance at FBG levels of > 120 mg/dl (Odds Ratio of 2.7 [1.3-5.6] and 2h-BG levels > 140 mg/dl (141-160 mg/dl OR 1.8 [1.1-2.9], which was however lost after adjusting for age, sex and BMI.

Conclusions: In our study population we found a continuous increased risk for CHD at fasting and 2h-BG levels in the sub-diabetic glucose range, but no clear cut-off values for cardiovascular risk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus