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Spontaneous development of macular ischemia in a case of racemose hemangioma.

Panagiotidis D, Karagiannis D, Tsoumpris I - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Bottom Line: At presentation, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and counting fingers in her left eye (LE).Complete and systemic examination was unremarkable, excluding the possibility of Wyburn-Mason syndrome.Eight years after presentation, findings and BCVA in the LE have remained stable, with no extension of the retinal ischemia or development of neovascularization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Ophthalmology Department of Athens University, Attikon Hospital, Athens, Greece. dimitrioskaragiannis@doctors.org.uk

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a rare case of racemose hemangioma which developed spontaneous macular ischemia.

Methods: A 32-year-old healthy Caucasian lady presented complaining of recent deterioration of vision in her left eye. At presentation, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and counting fingers in her left eye (LE). Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography were performed. The patient had regular follow-up appointments over a period of 8 years.

Results: Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed findings consistent with arteriovenous communications of the retina or racemose hemangioma, in the posterior pole of the LE with the presence of macular ischemia. Complete and systemic examination was unremarkable, excluding the possibility of Wyburn-Mason syndrome. Eight years after presentation, findings and BCVA in the LE have remained stable, with no extension of the retinal ischemia or development of neovascularization.

Conclusion: Although extensive retinal ischemia has been reported to result in complications such as retinal or iris neovascularization, in our case the macular ischemia has not expanded further over a period of 8 years. However, due to this macular ischemia the patient unfortunately lost her central vision.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Color fundus picture of the left eye at presentation showing the retinal racemose angioma. The optic disc is obscured by vessels. The retinal vessels in the macular area are white indicating ischemia. Findings remained stable over the 8 year follow-up period.
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f1-opth-5-931: Color fundus picture of the left eye at presentation showing the retinal racemose angioma. The optic disc is obscured by vessels. The retinal vessels in the macular area are white indicating ischemia. Findings remained stable over the 8 year follow-up period.

Mentions: A 32-year-old healthy Caucasian lady presented complaining of recent deterioration of vision in her left eye (LE). At presentation, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and counting fingers in her LE. The anterior segment and intraocular pressures were normal in both eyes. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed findings consistent with arteriovenous communications of the retina or racemose hemangioma, in the posterior pole of the LE with the presence of macular ischemia (Figures 1 and 2). There were no other signs of peripheral ischemia. Complete and systemic examination including MRI scan was unremarkable, excluding the possibility of Wyburn-Mason syndrome with arteriovenous malformations of the optic nerve and midbrain. There was no family history of note. Eight years after initial presentation, findings and BCVA in the LE have remained stable, with no extension of the retinal ischemia or development of neovascularization.


Spontaneous development of macular ischemia in a case of racemose hemangioma.

Panagiotidis D, Karagiannis D, Tsoumpris I - Clin Ophthalmol (2011)

Color fundus picture of the left eye at presentation showing the retinal racemose angioma. The optic disc is obscured by vessels. The retinal vessels in the macular area are white indicating ischemia. Findings remained stable over the 8 year follow-up period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3141854&req=5

f1-opth-5-931: Color fundus picture of the left eye at presentation showing the retinal racemose angioma. The optic disc is obscured by vessels. The retinal vessels in the macular area are white indicating ischemia. Findings remained stable over the 8 year follow-up period.
Mentions: A 32-year-old healthy Caucasian lady presented complaining of recent deterioration of vision in her left eye (LE). At presentation, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and counting fingers in her LE. The anterior segment and intraocular pressures were normal in both eyes. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed findings consistent with arteriovenous communications of the retina or racemose hemangioma, in the posterior pole of the LE with the presence of macular ischemia (Figures 1 and 2). There were no other signs of peripheral ischemia. Complete and systemic examination including MRI scan was unremarkable, excluding the possibility of Wyburn-Mason syndrome with arteriovenous malformations of the optic nerve and midbrain. There was no family history of note. Eight years after initial presentation, findings and BCVA in the LE have remained stable, with no extension of the retinal ischemia or development of neovascularization.

Bottom Line: At presentation, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and counting fingers in her left eye (LE).Complete and systemic examination was unremarkable, excluding the possibility of Wyburn-Mason syndrome.Eight years after presentation, findings and BCVA in the LE have remained stable, with no extension of the retinal ischemia or development of neovascularization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Ophthalmology Department of Athens University, Attikon Hospital, Athens, Greece. dimitrioskaragiannis@doctors.org.uk

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a rare case of racemose hemangioma which developed spontaneous macular ischemia.

Methods: A 32-year-old healthy Caucasian lady presented complaining of recent deterioration of vision in her left eye. At presentation, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 in her right eye and counting fingers in her left eye (LE). Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography were performed. The patient had regular follow-up appointments over a period of 8 years.

Results: Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed findings consistent with arteriovenous communications of the retina or racemose hemangioma, in the posterior pole of the LE with the presence of macular ischemia. Complete and systemic examination was unremarkable, excluding the possibility of Wyburn-Mason syndrome. Eight years after presentation, findings and BCVA in the LE have remained stable, with no extension of the retinal ischemia or development of neovascularization.

Conclusion: Although extensive retinal ischemia has been reported to result in complications such as retinal or iris neovascularization, in our case the macular ischemia has not expanded further over a period of 8 years. However, due to this macular ischemia the patient unfortunately lost her central vision.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus