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Impact of external cue validity on driving performance in Parkinson's disease.

Scally K, Charlton JL, Iansek R, Bradshaw JL, Moss S, Georgiou-Karistianis N - Parkinsons Dis (2011)

Bottom Line: Results showed that PD drivers braked significantly later and travelled significantly further between deceleration and braking points compared with controls for Invalid and No-Cue conditions.The benefit of Valid Cues relative to Invalid Cues and No Cues was significantly greater for PD drivers compared with controls.These results highlight the importance of external cues and higher cognitive functioning for driving performance in mild to moderate PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Neuropsychology Research Unit, School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton Campus, VIC 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
This study sought to investigate the impact of external cue validity on simulated driving performance in 19 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 19 healthy age-matched controls. Braking points and distance between deceleration point and braking point were analysed for red traffic signals preceded either by Valid Cues (correctly predicting signal), Invalid Cues (incorrectly predicting signal), and No Cues. Results showed that PD drivers braked significantly later and travelled significantly further between deceleration and braking points compared with controls for Invalid and No-Cue conditions. No significant group differences were observed for driving performance in response to Valid Cues. The benefit of Valid Cues relative to Invalid Cues and No Cues was significantly greater for PD drivers compared with controls. Trail Making Test (B-A) scores correlated with driving performance for PDs only. These results highlight the importance of external cues and higher cognitive functioning for driving performance in mild to moderate PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of the Cueing Driving Event. Warning cue was either Valid (red flashing lights) or Invalid (green flashing lights).
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fig1: Example of the Cueing Driving Event. Warning cue was either Valid (red flashing lights) or Invalid (green flashing lights).

Mentions: The experiment consisted of a straight arterial drive with 26 traffic signals in total across the two drives (13 Red; 13 Green). The speed limit was set at 50 km/hr for this experiment to minimise the risk of simulator sickness as a consequence of the frequent stopping in the task. On approach to each traffic signal, participants either encountered no warning cue or one of two Warning Cues informing them about the phase of the upcoming traffic signal: Red or Green. The Warning Cue utilised was a modified version of the “Prepare to Stop” signal used on Australian roads, in which flashing amber lights indicate that the imminent traffic light is about to change from Green to Red. The warning cue was placed 70 metres prior to the traffic signal in accordance with its real world use. However, the sign was altered slightly for this experiment. Instead of amber lights that flashed or did not flash, the sign utilised flashing red lights to indicate a change to Red and flashing green lights to indicate an upcoming Green light. Therefore, the Warning Cue was either Valid (congruent with traffic signal) or Invalid (incongruent with traffic signal). Intersections were placed approximately 700 metres apart to allow participants time to accelerate up to 50 km/hr before approaching the next intersection. A diagram of the driving event is shown in Figure 1


Impact of external cue validity on driving performance in Parkinson's disease.

Scally K, Charlton JL, Iansek R, Bradshaw JL, Moss S, Georgiou-Karistianis N - Parkinsons Dis (2011)

Example of the Cueing Driving Event. Warning cue was either Valid (red flashing lights) or Invalid (green flashing lights).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140707&req=5

fig1: Example of the Cueing Driving Event. Warning cue was either Valid (red flashing lights) or Invalid (green flashing lights).
Mentions: The experiment consisted of a straight arterial drive with 26 traffic signals in total across the two drives (13 Red; 13 Green). The speed limit was set at 50 km/hr for this experiment to minimise the risk of simulator sickness as a consequence of the frequent stopping in the task. On approach to each traffic signal, participants either encountered no warning cue or one of two Warning Cues informing them about the phase of the upcoming traffic signal: Red or Green. The Warning Cue utilised was a modified version of the “Prepare to Stop” signal used on Australian roads, in which flashing amber lights indicate that the imminent traffic light is about to change from Green to Red. The warning cue was placed 70 metres prior to the traffic signal in accordance with its real world use. However, the sign was altered slightly for this experiment. Instead of amber lights that flashed or did not flash, the sign utilised flashing red lights to indicate a change to Red and flashing green lights to indicate an upcoming Green light. Therefore, the Warning Cue was either Valid (congruent with traffic signal) or Invalid (incongruent with traffic signal). Intersections were placed approximately 700 metres apart to allow participants time to accelerate up to 50 km/hr before approaching the next intersection. A diagram of the driving event is shown in Figure 1

Bottom Line: Results showed that PD drivers braked significantly later and travelled significantly further between deceleration and braking points compared with controls for Invalid and No-Cue conditions.The benefit of Valid Cues relative to Invalid Cues and No Cues was significantly greater for PD drivers compared with controls.These results highlight the importance of external cues and higher cognitive functioning for driving performance in mild to moderate PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Neuropsychology Research Unit, School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton Campus, VIC 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
This study sought to investigate the impact of external cue validity on simulated driving performance in 19 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 19 healthy age-matched controls. Braking points and distance between deceleration point and braking point were analysed for red traffic signals preceded either by Valid Cues (correctly predicting signal), Invalid Cues (incorrectly predicting signal), and No Cues. Results showed that PD drivers braked significantly later and travelled significantly further between deceleration and braking points compared with controls for Invalid and No-Cue conditions. No significant group differences were observed for driving performance in response to Valid Cues. The benefit of Valid Cues relative to Invalid Cues and No Cues was significantly greater for PD drivers compared with controls. Trail Making Test (B-A) scores correlated with driving performance for PDs only. These results highlight the importance of external cues and higher cognitive functioning for driving performance in mild to moderate PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus