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Prevention and health promotion in undergraduate medical education: Preferences, attitudes and previous knowledge of medical students - a cross-sectional study.

Klement A, Bretschneider K, Lautenschläger C, Stang A, Herrmann M, Haerting J - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2011)

Bottom Line: For the conception of an effective curriculum, it is helpful to know student preferences concerning teaching-formats, attitudes and self-estimated previous knowledge.Students' self-estimated poor previous knowledge of prevention and health promotion creates special challenges for curriculum development.High ratings of relevance assigned to prevention-related topics point to a motivational potential which should be utilized through suitable selection of teaching and testing formats to achieve effective and practice-relevant instructional content.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Sektion Allgemeinmedizin, Halle/Saale, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The interdisciplinary topic "prevention and health promotion" (Q10) was introduced into the medical training in Germany by the new medical licensing regulations in 2004. For the conception of an effective curriculum, it is helpful to know student preferences concerning teaching-formats, attitudes and self-estimated previous knowledge. Little is known concerning student perception of "prevention and health promotion" in Germany. Thus, this explorative cross-sectional study aims to provide a first step for closing this gap.

Methods: Medical students (n=220) in the fifth academic year were asked to fill in a standardized questionnaire prior to the Q10 curriculum. Questions focused on preferences for teaching and testing formats and self-estimated previous knowledge as well as on rating the importance of prevention topics and health risks. The questions were multiple choice, five-point Likert scales and open-ended questions.

Results: A total of 94 students filled questionnaires (42% response rate). Prevention and health promotion was rated as "important" or "very important" for their "own medical professionalism" by 68% of students. Ratings showed preferences for self-directed teaching and learning strategies, including case-based learning, and 78% wished for predominantly oral examinations. The self-estimated knowledge about prevention and health promotion is rated as "rather poor". The most favored training aim was "decision making within the physician-patient-relationship". Regarding medical health consultation, students frequently estimate "lifestyle factors" and "psychological disease" as being "very important".

Conclusion: Students' self-estimated poor previous knowledge of prevention and health promotion creates special challenges for curriculum development. High ratings of relevance assigned to prevention-related topics point to a motivational potential which should be utilized through suitable selection of teaching and testing formats to achieve effective and practice-relevant instructional content.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Agreement with statements on attitudes and positions concerning preventive medicine (five-point Likert scales) in % of answers
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Figure 4: Agreement with statements on attitudes and positions concerning preventive medicine (five-point Likert scales) in % of answers

Mentions: The statement that “healthcare insurance providers do not profit from the support of preventive measures” was rejected by 79 students (=83%) with “disagree completely”. The effectiveness of the previous medical curriculum on the topic of health promotion is rated with an average agreement value of 3.4 (SD=0.8) and a percentage of 42% responded with “disagree” or “disagree completely”. Men and women agreed with an average of two of four given statements (see Figure 4 (Fig. 4)).


Prevention and health promotion in undergraduate medical education: Preferences, attitudes and previous knowledge of medical students - a cross-sectional study.

Klement A, Bretschneider K, Lautenschläger C, Stang A, Herrmann M, Haerting J - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2011)

Agreement with statements on attitudes and positions concerning preventive medicine (five-point Likert scales) in % of answers
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140399&req=5

Figure 4: Agreement with statements on attitudes and positions concerning preventive medicine (five-point Likert scales) in % of answers
Mentions: The statement that “healthcare insurance providers do not profit from the support of preventive measures” was rejected by 79 students (=83%) with “disagree completely”. The effectiveness of the previous medical curriculum on the topic of health promotion is rated with an average agreement value of 3.4 (SD=0.8) and a percentage of 42% responded with “disagree” or “disagree completely”. Men and women agreed with an average of two of four given statements (see Figure 4 (Fig. 4)).

Bottom Line: For the conception of an effective curriculum, it is helpful to know student preferences concerning teaching-formats, attitudes and self-estimated previous knowledge.Students' self-estimated poor previous knowledge of prevention and health promotion creates special challenges for curriculum development.High ratings of relevance assigned to prevention-related topics point to a motivational potential which should be utilized through suitable selection of teaching and testing formats to achieve effective and practice-relevant instructional content.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Sektion Allgemeinmedizin, Halle/Saale, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The interdisciplinary topic "prevention and health promotion" (Q10) was introduced into the medical training in Germany by the new medical licensing regulations in 2004. For the conception of an effective curriculum, it is helpful to know student preferences concerning teaching-formats, attitudes and self-estimated previous knowledge. Little is known concerning student perception of "prevention and health promotion" in Germany. Thus, this explorative cross-sectional study aims to provide a first step for closing this gap.

Methods: Medical students (n=220) in the fifth academic year were asked to fill in a standardized questionnaire prior to the Q10 curriculum. Questions focused on preferences for teaching and testing formats and self-estimated previous knowledge as well as on rating the importance of prevention topics and health risks. The questions were multiple choice, five-point Likert scales and open-ended questions.

Results: A total of 94 students filled questionnaires (42% response rate). Prevention and health promotion was rated as "important" or "very important" for their "own medical professionalism" by 68% of students. Ratings showed preferences for self-directed teaching and learning strategies, including case-based learning, and 78% wished for predominantly oral examinations. The self-estimated knowledge about prevention and health promotion is rated as "rather poor". The most favored training aim was "decision making within the physician-patient-relationship". Regarding medical health consultation, students frequently estimate "lifestyle factors" and "psychological disease" as being "very important".

Conclusion: Students' self-estimated poor previous knowledge of prevention and health promotion creates special challenges for curriculum development. High ratings of relevance assigned to prevention-related topics point to a motivational potential which should be utilized through suitable selection of teaching and testing formats to achieve effective and practice-relevant instructional content.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus