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Lectures based on cardinal symptoms in undergraduate medicine - effects of evaluation-based interventions on teaching large groups.

Kuhnigk O, Weidtmann K, Anders S, Hüneke B, Santer R, Harendza S - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2011)

Bottom Line: Overall, on the basis of individual items students ranked the quality of the LSVs significantly higher than trained auditors during the first evaluation period.This effect was no longer seen after the second evaluation period.Further investigation is needed to determine the adequate frequency of evaluation and the format of feedback to guarantee sustainable effects of the didactic quality of lectures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Hamburg, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT
Despite critical voices lectures are still an important teaching format in current medical curricula. With the curricular reform at Hamburg Medical Faculty in the year 2004, all subject specific lectures were replaced by cardinal symptom oriented lectures (LSV) in the new clinical curriculum. LSVs are taught throughout all six thematic blocks in years three to five. Since regular student evaluations after each thematic block seemed to demand improvement of the LSVs, this study was carried out using evaluations of individual LSVs by the participating students and by trained auditors (final year students and academic staff). Based on these evaluations feedback containing the individual evaluation data was given in written form to the lecturers combined with information material on planning an LSV using modern didactic techniques. In a second evaluation period, the effects of this intervention were studied. Only small improvements in the LSVs' quality were noted regarding the level of marks achieved. When individual items were evaluated, especially the didactic quality, significant improvements were noticeable. Overall, on the basis of individual items students ranked the quality of the LSVs significantly higher than trained auditors during the first evaluation period. This effect was no longer seen after the second evaluation period. The inter rater reliability among the auditors was very good. This study shows that regular quality assurance is needed on the structural levels and for staff to accompany the process of embedding teaching formats into curricular concepts. Further investigation is needed to determine the adequate frequency of evaluation and the format of feedback to guarantee sustainable effects of the didactic quality of lectures.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of the means between the rating of the students and the auditors regarding individual items across all LSVs, leagues, and thematic blocks for the evaluation phases 1 and 2
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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T5: Comparison of the means between the rating of the students and the auditors regarding individual items across all LSVs, leagues, and thematic blocks for the evaluation phases 1 and 2

Mentions: A more differentiated picture compared to the one drawn by the school grades is shown by the comparison of individual items by the auditors from both evaluation phases (see table 4 (Tab. 4)). The second evaluation phase reveals six significant improvements in ratings after the intervention and all other items except for three show a positive trend. In total, the improvements regarding the items “orientation to cardinal symptoms”, “encouragement to follow the general train of thought”, “use of LSV concept”, “interactive design”, “depictive presentation”, and “effort to support successful learning” display large effect sizes. In the first evaluation phase the comparison between student and auditor ratings (see table 5 (Tab. 5)) on the basis of individual items shows statistically significant differences between both groups for almost all items with the auditors rating the lectures more critically than the students. Ratings from the second evaluation phase reveal a significant difference between student and auditor ratings for only one item.


Lectures based on cardinal symptoms in undergraduate medicine - effects of evaluation-based interventions on teaching large groups.

Kuhnigk O, Weidtmann K, Anders S, Hüneke B, Santer R, Harendza S - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2011)

Comparison of the means between the rating of the students and the auditors regarding individual items across all LSVs, leagues, and thematic blocks for the evaluation phases 1 and 2
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140396&req=5

T5: Comparison of the means between the rating of the students and the auditors regarding individual items across all LSVs, leagues, and thematic blocks for the evaluation phases 1 and 2
Mentions: A more differentiated picture compared to the one drawn by the school grades is shown by the comparison of individual items by the auditors from both evaluation phases (see table 4 (Tab. 4)). The second evaluation phase reveals six significant improvements in ratings after the intervention and all other items except for three show a positive trend. In total, the improvements regarding the items “orientation to cardinal symptoms”, “encouragement to follow the general train of thought”, “use of LSV concept”, “interactive design”, “depictive presentation”, and “effort to support successful learning” display large effect sizes. In the first evaluation phase the comparison between student and auditor ratings (see table 5 (Tab. 5)) on the basis of individual items shows statistically significant differences between both groups for almost all items with the auditors rating the lectures more critically than the students. Ratings from the second evaluation phase reveal a significant difference between student and auditor ratings for only one item.

Bottom Line: Overall, on the basis of individual items students ranked the quality of the LSVs significantly higher than trained auditors during the first evaluation period.This effect was no longer seen after the second evaluation period.Further investigation is needed to determine the adequate frequency of evaluation and the format of feedback to guarantee sustainable effects of the didactic quality of lectures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Hamburg, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT
Despite critical voices lectures are still an important teaching format in current medical curricula. With the curricular reform at Hamburg Medical Faculty in the year 2004, all subject specific lectures were replaced by cardinal symptom oriented lectures (LSV) in the new clinical curriculum. LSVs are taught throughout all six thematic blocks in years three to five. Since regular student evaluations after each thematic block seemed to demand improvement of the LSVs, this study was carried out using evaluations of individual LSVs by the participating students and by trained auditors (final year students and academic staff). Based on these evaluations feedback containing the individual evaluation data was given in written form to the lecturers combined with information material on planning an LSV using modern didactic techniques. In a second evaluation period, the effects of this intervention were studied. Only small improvements in the LSVs' quality were noted regarding the level of marks achieved. When individual items were evaluated, especially the didactic quality, significant improvements were noticeable. Overall, on the basis of individual items students ranked the quality of the LSVs significantly higher than trained auditors during the first evaluation period. This effect was no longer seen after the second evaluation period. The inter rater reliability among the auditors was very good. This study shows that regular quality assurance is needed on the structural levels and for staff to accompany the process of embedding teaching formats into curricular concepts. Further investigation is needed to determine the adequate frequency of evaluation and the format of feedback to guarantee sustainable effects of the didactic quality of lectures.

No MeSH data available.