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Attitudes of medical students towards general practice: Effects of gender, a general practice clerkship and a modern curriculum.

Kruschinski C, Wiese B, Eberhard J, Hummers-Pradier E - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2011)

Bottom Line: The clerkship (a total of n=165 students of the "post" survey could be matched) contributed to positive attitudes of students of both gender, whereas the different curricula did not show such effects.Affective learning goals such as a positive attitude towards general practice have depended more on characteristics of students (gender) and effects of a clerkship in general practice than on the curriculum type (modern, traditional) so far.For the development of outcomes in medical education research as well as for the evolution of the Modern Curriculum such attitudes and other affective learning goals should be considered more frequently.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Hannover, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Aims: Planning a career in general practice depends on positive attitudes towards primary care. The aim of this study was to compare attitudes of medical students of a Modern Curriculum at Hannover Medical School with those of the Traditional Curriculum before (pre) and after (post) a three-week clerkship in general practice. In parallel, we aimed to analyse several other variables such as age and gender, which could influence the attitudes.

Methods: Prospective survey of n=287 5th-year students. Attitudes (dependent variable, Likert-scale items) as well as socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, rural/urban background), school leaving examination grades, former qualifications, experiences in general practice and career plans were requested. Attitudes were analysed separately according to these characteristics (e.g. career plans: general practitioner (GP)/specialist), curriculum type and pre/post the clerkship in general practice. Bi- and multivariate statistical analysis was used including a factor analysis for grouping of the attitude items.

Results: Most and remarkable differences of attitudes were seen after analysis according to gender. Women appreciated general practice more than men including a greater interest in chronic diseases, communication and psychosocial aspects. The clerkship (a total of n=165 students of the "post" survey could be matched) contributed to positive attitudes of students of both gender, whereas the different curricula did not show such effects.

Conclusions: Affective learning goals such as a positive attitude towards general practice have depended more on characteristics of students (gender) and effects of a clerkship in general practice than on the curriculum type (modern, traditional) so far. For the development of outcomes in medical education research as well as for the evolution of the Modern Curriculum such attitudes and other affective learning goals should be considered more frequently.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graph showing statistically significant attitude differences in the baseline data examined according to the planned specialisation (AM = general practice or internal medicine with no details provided of specialization); Representation of all items with p<0.001 (Kruskal-Wallis test). For a more detailed explanation of the items see Table 2.
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Figure 1: Graph showing statistically significant attitude differences in the baseline data examined according to the planned specialisation (AM = general practice or internal medicine with no details provided of specialization); Representation of all items with p<0.001 (Kruskal-Wallis test). For a more detailed explanation of the items see Table 2.

Mentions: The analysis of baseline data by gender showed a remarkable, statistically significant difference in a large number of the attitude questions (see Table 2 (Tab. 2) and Table 4 (Tab. 4)). The analysis separated by the Traditional and Modern Study Programmes (without medical school transfers) resulted in significantly fewer questions with statistically significant differences. Different career plans were significantly associated with particular attitudes (see Figure 1 (Fig. 1), presentation of the statistically significant results).


Attitudes of medical students towards general practice: Effects of gender, a general practice clerkship and a modern curriculum.

Kruschinski C, Wiese B, Eberhard J, Hummers-Pradier E - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2011)

Graph showing statistically significant attitude differences in the baseline data examined according to the planned specialisation (AM = general practice or internal medicine with no details provided of specialization); Representation of all items with p<0.001 (Kruskal-Wallis test). For a more detailed explanation of the items see Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140385&req=5

Figure 1: Graph showing statistically significant attitude differences in the baseline data examined according to the planned specialisation (AM = general practice or internal medicine with no details provided of specialization); Representation of all items with p<0.001 (Kruskal-Wallis test). For a more detailed explanation of the items see Table 2.
Mentions: The analysis of baseline data by gender showed a remarkable, statistically significant difference in a large number of the attitude questions (see Table 2 (Tab. 2) and Table 4 (Tab. 4)). The analysis separated by the Traditional and Modern Study Programmes (without medical school transfers) resulted in significantly fewer questions with statistically significant differences. Different career plans were significantly associated with particular attitudes (see Figure 1 (Fig. 1), presentation of the statistically significant results).

Bottom Line: The clerkship (a total of n=165 students of the "post" survey could be matched) contributed to positive attitudes of students of both gender, whereas the different curricula did not show such effects.Affective learning goals such as a positive attitude towards general practice have depended more on characteristics of students (gender) and effects of a clerkship in general practice than on the curriculum type (modern, traditional) so far.For the development of outcomes in medical education research as well as for the evolution of the Modern Curriculum such attitudes and other affective learning goals should be considered more frequently.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Institut für Allgemeinmedizin, Hannover, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Aims: Planning a career in general practice depends on positive attitudes towards primary care. The aim of this study was to compare attitudes of medical students of a Modern Curriculum at Hannover Medical School with those of the Traditional Curriculum before (pre) and after (post) a three-week clerkship in general practice. In parallel, we aimed to analyse several other variables such as age and gender, which could influence the attitudes.

Methods: Prospective survey of n=287 5th-year students. Attitudes (dependent variable, Likert-scale items) as well as socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, rural/urban background), school leaving examination grades, former qualifications, experiences in general practice and career plans were requested. Attitudes were analysed separately according to these characteristics (e.g. career plans: general practitioner (GP)/specialist), curriculum type and pre/post the clerkship in general practice. Bi- and multivariate statistical analysis was used including a factor analysis for grouping of the attitude items.

Results: Most and remarkable differences of attitudes were seen after analysis according to gender. Women appreciated general practice more than men including a greater interest in chronic diseases, communication and psychosocial aspects. The clerkship (a total of n=165 students of the "post" survey could be matched) contributed to positive attitudes of students of both gender, whereas the different curricula did not show such effects.

Conclusions: Affective learning goals such as a positive attitude towards general practice have depended more on characteristics of students (gender) and effects of a clerkship in general practice than on the curriculum type (modern, traditional) so far. For the development of outcomes in medical education research as well as for the evolution of the Modern Curriculum such attitudes and other affective learning goals should be considered more frequently.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus