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Peer teaching in paediatrics - medical students as learners and teachers on a paediatric course.

Schauseil-Zipf U, Karay Y, Ehrlich R, Knoop K, Michalk D - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2010)

Bottom Line: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching.The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff.More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universität zu Köln, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinderheilkunde, Köln, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching. We established a peer assisted teaching program by student tutors with a focus on clinical competencies for students during their practical training on paediatric wards. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of a clinical skills training by tutors, residents and consultants on students evaluations of the teaching quality and the effects of a peer teaching program on self assessed clinical competencies by the students.

Methods: Medical student peers in their 6(th) year were trained by an intensive instruction program for teaching clinical skills by paediatric consultants, doctors and psychologists. 109 students in their 5(th) year (study group) participated in a peer assisted teaching program for training clinical skills in paediatrics. The skills training by student peer teachers were supervised by paediatric doctors. 45 students (control group) participated in a conventional paediatric skills training by paediatric doctors and consultants. Students from both groups, which were consecutively investigated, completed a questionnaire with an evaluation of the satisfaction with their practical training and a self assessment of their practical competencies.

Results: The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff. Self assessed learning success in practical skills was higher rated in the peer teaching program than in the conventional training.

Conclusions: The peer assisted teaching program of paediatric skills training was rated higher by the students regarding their satisfaction with the teaching quality and their self assessment of the acquired skills. Clinical skills training by student peer teachers have to be supervised by paediatric doctors. Paediatric doctors seem to be more motivated for their own teaching tasks if they are assisted by student peer teachers. More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

No MeSH data available.


Contents of the week-long trainings of student tutors for the block work placement in paediatrics
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T1: Contents of the week-long trainings of student tutors for the block work placement in paediatrics

Mentions: A new teaching model was introduced in the 2008/09 winter semester for the BWP in paediatrics, which shifted demonstrations and practical exercises of paediatric examination techniques (such as throat inspections, otoscopy, abdominal examinations) and the teaching of individual teaching modules developed by physicians (such as urine diagnostics, infusion treatment, inhalation treatment) into the area of responsibility of student tutors. For this purpose, eight tutors were trained for a week by a team of assistants and senior physicians of the clinic prior to the start of the 2008/09 winter semester at the University Paediatrics Hospital Cologne. These were students who had successfully passed the BWP during the previous semester. Apart from theoretical training in paediatrics and examination techniques, learning content such as dealing with students, doctors and medical staff and motivating patients and their parents were taught (see Table 1 (Tab. 1)). The training course was designed by the primary author. The week-long practical and theoretical tutor training was carried out by the senior physicians and experienced specialised doctors at the children’s hospital and the primary author.


Peer teaching in paediatrics - medical students as learners and teachers on a paediatric course.

Schauseil-Zipf U, Karay Y, Ehrlich R, Knoop K, Michalk D - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2010)

Contents of the week-long trainings of student tutors for the block work placement in paediatrics
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140377&req=5

T1: Contents of the week-long trainings of student tutors for the block work placement in paediatrics
Mentions: A new teaching model was introduced in the 2008/09 winter semester for the BWP in paediatrics, which shifted demonstrations and practical exercises of paediatric examination techniques (such as throat inspections, otoscopy, abdominal examinations) and the teaching of individual teaching modules developed by physicians (such as urine diagnostics, infusion treatment, inhalation treatment) into the area of responsibility of student tutors. For this purpose, eight tutors were trained for a week by a team of assistants and senior physicians of the clinic prior to the start of the 2008/09 winter semester at the University Paediatrics Hospital Cologne. These were students who had successfully passed the BWP during the previous semester. Apart from theoretical training in paediatrics and examination techniques, learning content such as dealing with students, doctors and medical staff and motivating patients and their parents were taught (see Table 1 (Tab. 1)). The training course was designed by the primary author. The week-long practical and theoretical tutor training was carried out by the senior physicians and experienced specialised doctors at the children’s hospital and the primary author.

Bottom Line: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching.The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff.More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universität zu Köln, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinderheilkunde, Köln, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching. We established a peer assisted teaching program by student tutors with a focus on clinical competencies for students during their practical training on paediatric wards. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of a clinical skills training by tutors, residents and consultants on students evaluations of the teaching quality and the effects of a peer teaching program on self assessed clinical competencies by the students.

Methods: Medical student peers in their 6(th) year were trained by an intensive instruction program for teaching clinical skills by paediatric consultants, doctors and psychologists. 109 students in their 5(th) year (study group) participated in a peer assisted teaching program for training clinical skills in paediatrics. The skills training by student peer teachers were supervised by paediatric doctors. 45 students (control group) participated in a conventional paediatric skills training by paediatric doctors and consultants. Students from both groups, which were consecutively investigated, completed a questionnaire with an evaluation of the satisfaction with their practical training and a self assessment of their practical competencies.

Results: The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff. Self assessed learning success in practical skills was higher rated in the peer teaching program than in the conventional training.

Conclusions: The peer assisted teaching program of paediatric skills training was rated higher by the students regarding their satisfaction with the teaching quality and their self assessment of the acquired skills. Clinical skills training by student peer teachers have to be supervised by paediatric doctors. Paediatric doctors seem to be more motivated for their own teaching tasks if they are assisted by student peer teachers. More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

No MeSH data available.