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Peer teaching in paediatrics - medical students as learners and teachers on a paediatric course.

Schauseil-Zipf U, Karay Y, Ehrlich R, Knoop K, Michalk D - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2010)

Bottom Line: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching.The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff.More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universität zu Köln, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinderheilkunde, Köln, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching. We established a peer assisted teaching program by student tutors with a focus on clinical competencies for students during their practical training on paediatric wards. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of a clinical skills training by tutors, residents and consultants on students evaluations of the teaching quality and the effects of a peer teaching program on self assessed clinical competencies by the students.

Methods: Medical student peers in their 6(th) year were trained by an intensive instruction program for teaching clinical skills by paediatric consultants, doctors and psychologists. 109 students in their 5(th) year (study group) participated in a peer assisted teaching program for training clinical skills in paediatrics. The skills training by student peer teachers were supervised by paediatric doctors. 45 students (control group) participated in a conventional paediatric skills training by paediatric doctors and consultants. Students from both groups, which were consecutively investigated, completed a questionnaire with an evaluation of the satisfaction with their practical training and a self assessment of their practical competencies.

Results: The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff. Self assessed learning success in practical skills was higher rated in the peer teaching program than in the conventional training.

Conclusions: The peer assisted teaching program of paediatric skills training was rated higher by the students regarding their satisfaction with the teaching quality and their self assessment of the acquired skills. Clinical skills training by student peer teachers have to be supervised by paediatric doctors. Paediatric doctors seem to be more motivated for their own teaching tasks if they are assisted by student peer teachers. More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

No MeSH data available.


Mean values and standard deviations of the student evaluations of the block work placement in paediatrics (BWP Pd) before and after the introduction of student tutoring.
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Figure 1: Mean values and standard deviations of the student evaluations of the block work placement in paediatrics (BWP Pd) before and after the introduction of student tutoring.

Mentions: The mean values (MV) and standard deviations (SD) of the evaluations are shown in Figure 1 (Fig. 1). For the question “How do you rate the practical relevance of the block placement?” the average was 3.29 (SD 1.239) for the 08 summer semester and 1.93 (SD 0.686) for the 08/09 winter semester. The practical relevance of the conventional BWP in paediatrics was judged as “good” or “very good” by 32.4% of students in the 08 summer semester; for the new model, this rate was 82.4% (p <0.001). For the question “How do you rate the BWP in paediatrics compared to the placements in other clinical subjects?” the MV for the 08 summer semester was 2.87 (SD 1.119) and 1.81 (SD 0.866) for the 08/09 winter semester. In comparison to other clinical block work placements the BWP in paediatrics was rated “good” or “very good” considerably more often (83.5%) in the 08/09 winter semester than in the 08 summer semester (36.8%) (p<0,001). For the question “How do you rate the BWP in terms of your confidence in dealing with children?” the MV were 3.34 (SD 1.341) in the 08 summer semester and 2.27 (SD 0.762) in the 08/09 winter semester. The evaluation of the BWP in relation to the confidence of the students in dealing with children also showed a significant increase of good and very good ratings of 64.7% in the new concept compared to 31.6% in the conventional BWP (p <0.001).


Peer teaching in paediatrics - medical students as learners and teachers on a paediatric course.

Schauseil-Zipf U, Karay Y, Ehrlich R, Knoop K, Michalk D - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2010)

Mean values and standard deviations of the student evaluations of the block work placement in paediatrics (BWP Pd) before and after the introduction of student tutoring.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140377&req=5

Figure 1: Mean values and standard deviations of the student evaluations of the block work placement in paediatrics (BWP Pd) before and after the introduction of student tutoring.
Mentions: The mean values (MV) and standard deviations (SD) of the evaluations are shown in Figure 1 (Fig. 1). For the question “How do you rate the practical relevance of the block placement?” the average was 3.29 (SD 1.239) for the 08 summer semester and 1.93 (SD 0.686) for the 08/09 winter semester. The practical relevance of the conventional BWP in paediatrics was judged as “good” or “very good” by 32.4% of students in the 08 summer semester; for the new model, this rate was 82.4% (p <0.001). For the question “How do you rate the BWP in paediatrics compared to the placements in other clinical subjects?” the MV for the 08 summer semester was 2.87 (SD 1.119) and 1.81 (SD 0.866) for the 08/09 winter semester. In comparison to other clinical block work placements the BWP in paediatrics was rated “good” or “very good” considerably more often (83.5%) in the 08/09 winter semester than in the 08 summer semester (36.8%) (p<0,001). For the question “How do you rate the BWP in terms of your confidence in dealing with children?” the MV were 3.34 (SD 1.341) in the 08 summer semester and 2.27 (SD 0.762) in the 08/09 winter semester. The evaluation of the BWP in relation to the confidence of the students in dealing with children also showed a significant increase of good and very good ratings of 64.7% in the new concept compared to 31.6% in the conventional BWP (p <0.001).

Bottom Line: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching.The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff.More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Universität zu Köln, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinderheilkunde, Köln, Deutschland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching. We established a peer assisted teaching program by student tutors with a focus on clinical competencies for students during their practical training on paediatric wards. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of a clinical skills training by tutors, residents and consultants on students evaluations of the teaching quality and the effects of a peer teaching program on self assessed clinical competencies by the students.

Methods: Medical student peers in their 6(th) year were trained by an intensive instruction program for teaching clinical skills by paediatric consultants, doctors and psychologists. 109 students in their 5(th) year (study group) participated in a peer assisted teaching program for training clinical skills in paediatrics. The skills training by student peer teachers were supervised by paediatric doctors. 45 students (control group) participated in a conventional paediatric skills training by paediatric doctors and consultants. Students from both groups, which were consecutively investigated, completed a questionnaire with an evaluation of the satisfaction with their practical training and a self assessment of their practical competencies.

Results: The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff. Self assessed learning success in practical skills was higher rated in the peer teaching program than in the conventional training.

Conclusions: The peer assisted teaching program of paediatric skills training was rated higher by the students regarding their satisfaction with the teaching quality and their self assessment of the acquired skills. Clinical skills training by student peer teachers have to be supervised by paediatric doctors. Paediatric doctors seem to be more motivated for their own teaching tasks if they are assisted by student peer teachers. More research is needed to investigate the influence of peer teaching on the motivation of paediatric doctors to teach medical students und the academic performance of the student peers.

No MeSH data available.