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Gender and sex: issues in medical education.

Lagro-Janssen T - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2010)

Bottom Line: If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent.Next, factors that can facilitate or impede the implementation of gender specific medical education are described.Finally, the author discusses what needs to be done to educate future physicians that are equipped with appropriate expertise to deal with aspects of gender in medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Radboud University Medical Center, Faculty of General Practice, Women´s Studies Medical Science, Nijmegen, Netherland.

ABSTRACT
There is ample scientific evidence to support the importance of gender issues in health and illness. If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent. In this paper examples are given that show how knowledge, attitudes and skills relating to sex and gender can be implemented in both optional and compulsory courses. Next, factors that can facilitate or impede the implementation of gender specific medical education are described. Finally, the author discusses what needs to be done to educate future physicians that are equipped with appropriate expertise to deal with aspects of gender in medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Characteristics of the successful integration of gender into the basic medical curriculum.
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Figure 1: Characteristics of the successful integration of gender into the basic medical curriculum.

Mentions: Health differences between the sexes, besides being related to biological differences, are also related to psychological, social and cultural factors [3]. Some examples of additional differences between male and female patients include risk factors, the development of gender identity, the life cycle, communication and the consequences of diseases and their treatment. If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent. Therefore, we have drafted a list of conditions, based on medical literature, interviews with experts and personal experiences, which successful integration of sex and gender in the medical curriculum needs to meet (see Figure 1 (Fig. 1)).


Gender and sex: issues in medical education.

Lagro-Janssen T - GMS Z Med Ausbild (2010)

Characteristics of the successful integration of gender into the basic medical curriculum.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140363&req=5

Figure 1: Characteristics of the successful integration of gender into the basic medical curriculum.
Mentions: Health differences between the sexes, besides being related to biological differences, are also related to psychological, social and cultural factors [3]. Some examples of additional differences between male and female patients include risk factors, the development of gender identity, the life cycle, communication and the consequences of diseases and their treatment. If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent. Therefore, we have drafted a list of conditions, based on medical literature, interviews with experts and personal experiences, which successful integration of sex and gender in the medical curriculum needs to meet (see Figure 1 (Fig. 1)).

Bottom Line: If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent.Next, factors that can facilitate or impede the implementation of gender specific medical education are described.Finally, the author discusses what needs to be done to educate future physicians that are equipped with appropriate expertise to deal with aspects of gender in medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Radboud University Medical Center, Faculty of General Practice, Women´s Studies Medical Science, Nijmegen, Netherland.

ABSTRACT
There is ample scientific evidence to support the importance of gender issues in health and illness. If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent. In this paper examples are given that show how knowledge, attitudes and skills relating to sex and gender can be implemented in both optional and compulsory courses. Next, factors that can facilitate or impede the implementation of gender specific medical education are described. Finally, the author discusses what needs to be done to educate future physicians that are equipped with appropriate expertise to deal with aspects of gender in medicine.

No MeSH data available.