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Scientific respiratory symposium, paris june 2010.

Dalglish G, Priestley G - J Asthma Allergy (2011)

Bottom Line: At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians.This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD.Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Horizon Medical Publishing, Chichester, UK.

ABSTRACT
At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians. This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD. Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of patients making at least one error using their inhaler.70Note: *P < 0.05 compared with the best result (95% CI).Abbreviations: CI, confidence intervals; pMDI, metered dose inhaler.
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f2-jaa-4-061: Percentage of patients making at least one error using their inhaler.70Note: *P < 0.05 compared with the best result (95% CI).Abbreviations: CI, confidence intervals; pMDI, metered dose inhaler.

Mentions: These problems of assessment are true for inhalation technique as well as control, many physicians underestimating the proportion of device misuse by patients69 and overestimating the education they give to patients about inhaler use. Studies found that inhalation technique was not appropriate in health professionals either: inappropriate technique was observed in 65% of nurses, 63% of general practitioners, 53% of fellows, and 15% of specialists. Education in inhaler technique requires a cycle of explanation, demonstration, checking of the patient’s technique, and then repeating or, if necessary, changing the device type if correct performance is not achieved. Such education is very important; with some devices, patient education has been shown to reduce the rate of critical errors from almost 60% to around 10% of patients. Critical errors, defined as errors that could substantially affect the dose delivered to the lung, can be nonspecific to a particular device, such as failure to inhale through the mouth-piece, or device-specific, such as blowing into a DPI before inhalation. In a study of 3811 patients using a variety of inhalers, 76% of patients made at least one error with pMDI compared with 49% to 55% with BAIs (Figures 2 and 3).70 What are the consequences of poor inhalation technique in real life? Inhalation technique is critical to the success of asthma therapy, poor technique with MDIs causing 60% lower lung deposition and 30% less bronchodilation, and thus poor asthma control. In a study in which patients were treated for the lung deposition achieved by 18 patients using a pMDI or a BAI, poor pMDI co-ordinators achieved lung deposition less than 7% of the dose, good pMDI coordinators 25% of the dose and BAI users 23%.71 In another study of errors and omissions among 3955 unselected asthmatics on pMDI-delivered ICS were recorded72 (Table 4).


Scientific respiratory symposium, paris june 2010.

Dalglish G, Priestley G - J Asthma Allergy (2011)

Percentage of patients making at least one error using their inhaler.70Note: *P < 0.05 compared with the best result (95% CI).Abbreviations: CI, confidence intervals; pMDI, metered dose inhaler.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140297&req=5

f2-jaa-4-061: Percentage of patients making at least one error using their inhaler.70Note: *P < 0.05 compared with the best result (95% CI).Abbreviations: CI, confidence intervals; pMDI, metered dose inhaler.
Mentions: These problems of assessment are true for inhalation technique as well as control, many physicians underestimating the proportion of device misuse by patients69 and overestimating the education they give to patients about inhaler use. Studies found that inhalation technique was not appropriate in health professionals either: inappropriate technique was observed in 65% of nurses, 63% of general practitioners, 53% of fellows, and 15% of specialists. Education in inhaler technique requires a cycle of explanation, demonstration, checking of the patient’s technique, and then repeating or, if necessary, changing the device type if correct performance is not achieved. Such education is very important; with some devices, patient education has been shown to reduce the rate of critical errors from almost 60% to around 10% of patients. Critical errors, defined as errors that could substantially affect the dose delivered to the lung, can be nonspecific to a particular device, such as failure to inhale through the mouth-piece, or device-specific, such as blowing into a DPI before inhalation. In a study of 3811 patients using a variety of inhalers, 76% of patients made at least one error with pMDI compared with 49% to 55% with BAIs (Figures 2 and 3).70 What are the consequences of poor inhalation technique in real life? Inhalation technique is critical to the success of asthma therapy, poor technique with MDIs causing 60% lower lung deposition and 30% less bronchodilation, and thus poor asthma control. In a study in which patients were treated for the lung deposition achieved by 18 patients using a pMDI or a BAI, poor pMDI co-ordinators achieved lung deposition less than 7% of the dose, good pMDI coordinators 25% of the dose and BAI users 23%.71 In another study of errors and omissions among 3955 unselected asthmatics on pMDI-delivered ICS were recorded72 (Table 4).

Bottom Line: At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians.This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD.Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Horizon Medical Publishing, Chichester, UK.

ABSTRACT
At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians. This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD. Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus