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3D Symmetry Measure Invariant to Subject Pose During Image Acquisition.

Kawale M, Lee J, Leung SY, Fingeret MC, Reece GP, Crosby MA, Beahm EK, Markey MK, Merchant FA - Breast Cancer (Auckl) (2011)

Bottom Line: In order to quantify the effect of pose, we introduce a new measure; the 3D pBRA (Percentage Breast Retraction Assessment) index, and validate its use against the 2D pBRA index.The quantitative assessment of 3D asymmetry was found to be invariant of subject pose.Problems with pose that are inherent in 2D photographs are avoided and fiducial point identification is made easier by being able to panoramically rotate the 3D surface enabling views from any desired angle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this study we evaluate the influence of subject pose during image acquisition on quantitative analysis of breast morphology. Three (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) images of the torso of 12 female subjects in two different poses; (1) hands-on-hip (HH) and (2) hands-down (HD) were obtained. In order to quantify the effect of pose, we introduce a new measure; the 3D pBRA (Percentage Breast Retraction Assessment) index, and validate its use against the 2D pBRA index. Our data suggests that the 3D pBRA index is linearly correlated with the 2D counterpart for both of the poses, and is independent of the localization of fiducial points within a tolerance limit of 7 mm. The quantitative assessment of 3D asymmetry was found to be invariant of subject pose. This study further corroborates the advantages of 3D stereophotogrammetry over 2D photography. Problems with pose that are inherent in 2D photographs are avoided and fiducial point identification is made easier by being able to panoramically rotate the 3D surface enabling views from any desired angle.

No MeSH data available.


Poses used in this study. A) Hands-down pose and B) Handson-hips pose.
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f1-bcbcr-5-2011-131: Poses used in this study. A) Hands-down pose and B) Handson-hips pose.

Mentions: Female patients who underwent or were scheduled for breast reconstruction surgery at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were recruited for this study under a protocol approved by the institutional review board. In addition, four healthy female volunteers were commissioned under contract to participate in the study. We used images acquired in two different poses, hands-on-hips (HH) and hands-down (HD) (shown in Fig. 1). 3D and 2D images were obtained of eight patients who had not yet undergone breast reconstruction surgery (both breasts and nipples intact) and of the four commissioned volunteers. The subjects (patients and volunteers) ranged in age from 30 to 64; 9 were white and 3 were Hispanic/Latino. The patients ranged in weight and height from 51.7 to 61.7 kg (57 ± 3.3 kg) and 1.49 to 1.78 m (1.64 ± 0.1 m) respectively with body mass index (BMI) in the range of 20 to 25 kg/m2 (21.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2). BMI information was not available for the healthy female volunteers.


3D Symmetry Measure Invariant to Subject Pose During Image Acquisition.

Kawale M, Lee J, Leung SY, Fingeret MC, Reece GP, Crosby MA, Beahm EK, Markey MK, Merchant FA - Breast Cancer (Auckl) (2011)

Poses used in this study. A) Hands-down pose and B) Handson-hips pose.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140267&req=5

f1-bcbcr-5-2011-131: Poses used in this study. A) Hands-down pose and B) Handson-hips pose.
Mentions: Female patients who underwent or were scheduled for breast reconstruction surgery at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were recruited for this study under a protocol approved by the institutional review board. In addition, four healthy female volunteers were commissioned under contract to participate in the study. We used images acquired in two different poses, hands-on-hips (HH) and hands-down (HD) (shown in Fig. 1). 3D and 2D images were obtained of eight patients who had not yet undergone breast reconstruction surgery (both breasts and nipples intact) and of the four commissioned volunteers. The subjects (patients and volunteers) ranged in age from 30 to 64; 9 were white and 3 were Hispanic/Latino. The patients ranged in weight and height from 51.7 to 61.7 kg (57 ± 3.3 kg) and 1.49 to 1.78 m (1.64 ± 0.1 m) respectively with body mass index (BMI) in the range of 20 to 25 kg/m2 (21.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2). BMI information was not available for the healthy female volunteers.

Bottom Line: In order to quantify the effect of pose, we introduce a new measure; the 3D pBRA (Percentage Breast Retraction Assessment) index, and validate its use against the 2D pBRA index.The quantitative assessment of 3D asymmetry was found to be invariant of subject pose.Problems with pose that are inherent in 2D photographs are avoided and fiducial point identification is made easier by being able to panoramically rotate the 3D surface enabling views from any desired angle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this study we evaluate the influence of subject pose during image acquisition on quantitative analysis of breast morphology. Three (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) images of the torso of 12 female subjects in two different poses; (1) hands-on-hip (HH) and (2) hands-down (HD) were obtained. In order to quantify the effect of pose, we introduce a new measure; the 3D pBRA (Percentage Breast Retraction Assessment) index, and validate its use against the 2D pBRA index. Our data suggests that the 3D pBRA index is linearly correlated with the 2D counterpart for both of the poses, and is independent of the localization of fiducial points within a tolerance limit of 7 mm. The quantitative assessment of 3D asymmetry was found to be invariant of subject pose. This study further corroborates the advantages of 3D stereophotogrammetry over 2D photography. Problems with pose that are inherent in 2D photographs are avoided and fiducial point identification is made easier by being able to panoramically rotate the 3D surface enabling views from any desired angle.

No MeSH data available.