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Digital imaging in cytopathology.

Khalbuss WE, Pantanowitz L, Parwani AV - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Bottom Line: The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide.This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists.In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pathology Informatics, Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, USA.

ABSTRACT
Rapid advances are occurring in the field of cytopathology, particularly in the field of digital imaging. Today, digital images are used in a variety of settings including education (E-education), as a substitute to multiheaded sessions, multisite conferences, publications, cytopathology web pages, cytology proficiency testing, telecytology, consultation through telecytology, and automated screening of Pap test slides. The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide. This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists. Whole slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert pathology and cytology glass slides into digital images (digital slides) that can be viewed remotely on a workstation using viewing software. In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process.

No MeSH data available.


An example of a teaching conference created using whole-slide images. The viewer allows for easy manipulation of images while the user can select from a list of cases that are part of the software. The image of what is a WSI shown with the Aperio ImageScope viewer. Top right shows thumbnail digital images of scanned slides made available via hyeperlinks using an Oracle server. Content related to each scanned slide is incorporated using ColdFusion (Adobe) software.
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fig3: An example of a teaching conference created using whole-slide images. The viewer allows for easy manipulation of images while the user can select from a list of cases that are part of the software. The image of what is a WSI shown with the Aperio ImageScope viewer. Top right shows thumbnail digital images of scanned slides made available via hyeperlinks using an Oracle server. Content related to each scanned slide is incorporated using ColdFusion (Adobe) software.

Mentions: WSI has been successfully used for teaching cytopathology and surgical pathology and accordingly integrated into academic practice [3, 22, 35]. The use of digital slides for cytology education adds new dimensions to accessibility [35]. Comprehensive digital slide libraries are accessible from home. Slides may be annotated and shared by participants such as pathology residents before conferences [2]. With digital slide conferences, there are many advantages such as improved accessibility to large teaching sets and enhanced annotations with related clinical materials such as radiology images. Due to the increase in usage of WSI in pathology and cytology education, adequate digital pathology and cytology training is becoming a necessary component of pathology resident training. Once the necessary slides in cytology are digitized, an online course or even a “virtual” rotation may be created for residency education [12, 32, 36] (Figure 3). The concept of virtual rotation for cytopathology is similar to some online courses in pathology such as the virtual rotation in pathology informatics [37]. The course includes didactic lectures given by experts in the field as well as online modules and courses. The online course can accommodate various rotation structures as a self-paced rotation and is available to all pathology residency programs. Some residency programs have started to incorporate this virtual rotation in their resident training [37]. The same resource and expertise can be used to add didactic lectures to the digital teaching set program to create a virtual subspecialty rotation in cytopathology [35]. Similar digital teaching sets may be developed in almost all specialties of anatomic pathology such as the virtual slide box from the USCAP.


Digital imaging in cytopathology.

Khalbuss WE, Pantanowitz L, Parwani AV - Patholog Res Int (2011)

An example of a teaching conference created using whole-slide images. The viewer allows for easy manipulation of images while the user can select from a list of cases that are part of the software. The image of what is a WSI shown with the Aperio ImageScope viewer. Top right shows thumbnail digital images of scanned slides made available via hyeperlinks using an Oracle server. Content related to each scanned slide is incorporated using ColdFusion (Adobe) software.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140195&req=5

fig3: An example of a teaching conference created using whole-slide images. The viewer allows for easy manipulation of images while the user can select from a list of cases that are part of the software. The image of what is a WSI shown with the Aperio ImageScope viewer. Top right shows thumbnail digital images of scanned slides made available via hyeperlinks using an Oracle server. Content related to each scanned slide is incorporated using ColdFusion (Adobe) software.
Mentions: WSI has been successfully used for teaching cytopathology and surgical pathology and accordingly integrated into academic practice [3, 22, 35]. The use of digital slides for cytology education adds new dimensions to accessibility [35]. Comprehensive digital slide libraries are accessible from home. Slides may be annotated and shared by participants such as pathology residents before conferences [2]. With digital slide conferences, there are many advantages such as improved accessibility to large teaching sets and enhanced annotations with related clinical materials such as radiology images. Due to the increase in usage of WSI in pathology and cytology education, adequate digital pathology and cytology training is becoming a necessary component of pathology resident training. Once the necessary slides in cytology are digitized, an online course or even a “virtual” rotation may be created for residency education [12, 32, 36] (Figure 3). The concept of virtual rotation for cytopathology is similar to some online courses in pathology such as the virtual rotation in pathology informatics [37]. The course includes didactic lectures given by experts in the field as well as online modules and courses. The online course can accommodate various rotation structures as a self-paced rotation and is available to all pathology residency programs. Some residency programs have started to incorporate this virtual rotation in their resident training [37]. The same resource and expertise can be used to add didactic lectures to the digital teaching set program to create a virtual subspecialty rotation in cytopathology [35]. Similar digital teaching sets may be developed in almost all specialties of anatomic pathology such as the virtual slide box from the USCAP.

Bottom Line: The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide.This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists.In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pathology Informatics, Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, USA.

ABSTRACT
Rapid advances are occurring in the field of cytopathology, particularly in the field of digital imaging. Today, digital images are used in a variety of settings including education (E-education), as a substitute to multiheaded sessions, multisite conferences, publications, cytopathology web pages, cytology proficiency testing, telecytology, consultation through telecytology, and automated screening of Pap test slides. The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide. This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists. Whole slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert pathology and cytology glass slides into digital images (digital slides) that can be viewed remotely on a workstation using viewing software. In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process.

No MeSH data available.