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Saify K, Saraswat PK, Mishra D, Jeswani P - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2010)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, G R Medical College, Gwalior, India.

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There was no history of trauma to penis, localized dermatoses, systemic diseases or any prolonged medications... There was no history of any significant illness in the partner... The condition was initially diagnosed clinically as a case of penile psoriasis and treated with potent topical corticosteroids... There was partial response to the treatment with some reduction in scaling, but the patch gradually increased in size and became elevated over the course of time... HIV tests were normal... Hematological, biochemical and radiological examination did not reveal any abnormality... PKMB presents as a slowly enlarging hyperkeratotic plaque on the glans penis... In the present case, the condition started as a hyperkeratotic plaque on the glans penis... The spectrum of histologic findings may range from hypertrophic-hyperplastic penile dystrophy to verrucous carcinoma... However, in the case of Child et al., HPV DNA was not identifiable using broad-spectrum polymerase chain reaction in the lesion of verrucous carcinoma arising out of PKMB lesion... Because evidence from published literature suggests that this lesion may have locally invasive or aggressive tendencies and that it should be considered to have low-grade or limited malignant potential, conservative surgical removal seems to be adequate therapy, which offers good prognosis... In our case, because the lesion persisted for a long duration, and although biopsy did not suggest evidence of malignancy, a partial amputation of the penis was performed with removal of tumor and securing a clear tissue margin to prevent the development of carcinoma later in life... Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed to rule out carcinomatous process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hyperkeratotic plaques on the glans penis
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Figure 0001: Hyperkeratotic plaques on the glans penis

Mentions: A 60-year-old uncircumcised male presented with asymptomatic growth on the glans penis of 7 years duration. There were no complaints or past history suggestive of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). There was no history of trauma to penis, localized dermatoses, systemic diseases or any prolonged medications. There was no history of any significant illness in the partner. The condition was initially diagnosed clinically as a case of penile psoriasis and treated with potent topical corticosteroids. There was partial response to the treatment with some reduction in scaling, but the patch gradually increased in size and became elevated over the course of time. Over the past 1 year, the lesion started increasing in the size, developed verrucosity and thick mica-like scaling. On examination, there was hyperkeratotic, hypertrophic, verrucous plaque with thick scaling on the glans and rim of erythema. His S. VDRL and S. HIV tests were normal. Hematological, biochemical and radiological examination did not reveal any abnormality. Histopathological examination with hematoxylin and eosin staining showed irregular exo-endophytic hyperplasia of the epidermis with elongated downgrowths. There was prominent mitotic activity of the basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis with mild atypia and pleomorphism of nuclei. The surface showed a marked thick, parakeratotic stratum corneum. A focally lichenoid lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was present [Figures 1 and 2].


What is your diagnosis?

Saify K, Saraswat PK, Mishra D, Jeswani P - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2010)

Hyperkeratotic plaques on the glans penis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140156&req=5

Figure 0001: Hyperkeratotic plaques on the glans penis
Mentions: A 60-year-old uncircumcised male presented with asymptomatic growth on the glans penis of 7 years duration. There were no complaints or past history suggestive of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). There was no history of trauma to penis, localized dermatoses, systemic diseases or any prolonged medications. There was no history of any significant illness in the partner. The condition was initially diagnosed clinically as a case of penile psoriasis and treated with potent topical corticosteroids. There was partial response to the treatment with some reduction in scaling, but the patch gradually increased in size and became elevated over the course of time. Over the past 1 year, the lesion started increasing in the size, developed verrucosity and thick mica-like scaling. On examination, there was hyperkeratotic, hypertrophic, verrucous plaque with thick scaling on the glans and rim of erythema. His S. VDRL and S. HIV tests were normal. Hematological, biochemical and radiological examination did not reveal any abnormality. Histopathological examination with hematoxylin and eosin staining showed irregular exo-endophytic hyperplasia of the epidermis with elongated downgrowths. There was prominent mitotic activity of the basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis with mild atypia and pleomorphism of nuclei. The surface showed a marked thick, parakeratotic stratum corneum. A focally lichenoid lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was present [Figures 1 and 2].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, G R Medical College, Gwalior, India.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

There was no history of trauma to penis, localized dermatoses, systemic diseases or any prolonged medications... There was no history of any significant illness in the partner... The condition was initially diagnosed clinically as a case of penile psoriasis and treated with potent topical corticosteroids... There was partial response to the treatment with some reduction in scaling, but the patch gradually increased in size and became elevated over the course of time... HIV tests were normal... Hematological, biochemical and radiological examination did not reveal any abnormality... PKMB presents as a slowly enlarging hyperkeratotic plaque on the glans penis... In the present case, the condition started as a hyperkeratotic plaque on the glans penis... The spectrum of histologic findings may range from hypertrophic-hyperplastic penile dystrophy to verrucous carcinoma... However, in the case of Child et al., HPV DNA was not identifiable using broad-spectrum polymerase chain reaction in the lesion of verrucous carcinoma arising out of PKMB lesion... Because evidence from published literature suggests that this lesion may have locally invasive or aggressive tendencies and that it should be considered to have low-grade or limited malignant potential, conservative surgical removal seems to be adequate therapy, which offers good prognosis... In our case, because the lesion persisted for a long duration, and although biopsy did not suggest evidence of malignancy, a partial amputation of the penis was performed with removal of tumor and securing a clear tissue margin to prevent the development of carcinoma later in life... Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed to rule out carcinomatous process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus