Limits...
Bioactivity of Syzygium jambos methanolic extracts: Antibacterial activity and toxicity.

Mohanty S, Cock IE - Pharmacognosy Res (2010)

Bottom Line: Methanol extracts from S. jambos leaves were tested for antimicrobial activity and toxicity.The leaf extract also proved to be toxic in the Artemia franciscana bioassay, with a 48-h LC(50) of 387.9 ± 38.8 µg/mL, making it slightly more toxic than Mevinphos (505.3± 37.7 µg/mL) and approximately 5-fold less toxic than potassium dichromate (80.4 ± 4.3 µg/mL).Whilst potassium dichromate's LC(50) remained constant across the 72-hour test period (24-h LC(50), 86.3 ± 5.1; 72-h LC(50), 77.9 ± 4.9), the extract and Mevinphos LC(50) values decreased by 72 hours (87.0 ± 11.3 µg/mL and 103.9 ± 12.8 µg/mL, respectively), indicating their similar levels of toxicity in the assay.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Rd., Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland 4111, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Methanol extracts from S. jambos leaves were tested for antimicrobial activity and toxicity. S. jambos leaf extract inhibited the growth of 4 of the 14 bacteria tested (29%). Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial growths were inhibited by S. jambos leaf extract, although gram-positive bacteria appeared more susceptible. Two of the 10 gram-negative bacteria (20%) and 2 of the 4 gram-positive bacteria (50%) tested had their growths inhibited by the extract. The leaf extract also proved to be toxic in the Artemia franciscana bioassay, with a 48-h LC(50) of 387.9 ± 38.8 µg/mL, making it slightly more toxic than Mevinphos (505.3± 37.7 µg/mL) and approximately 5-fold less toxic than potassium dichromate (80.4 ± 4.3 µg/mL). Whilst potassium dichromate's LC(50) remained constant across the 72-hour test period (24-h LC(50), 86.3 ± 5.1; 72-h LC(50), 77.9 ± 4.9), the extract and Mevinphos LC(50) values decreased by 72 hours (87.0 ± 11.3 µg/mL and 103.9 ± 12.8 µg/mL, respectively), indicating their similar levels of toxicity in the assay.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brine shrimp lethality of (a) S. jambos leaf extract (1000 µg/ mL), (b) potassium dichromate (800 µg/mL) and (c) Mevinphos (2000 µg/mL). All bioassays were performed in at least triplicate and are expressed as mean ± standard deviation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140127&req=5

Figure 1: Brine shrimp lethality of (a) S. jambos leaf extract (1000 µg/ mL), (b) potassium dichromate (800 µg/mL) and (c) Mevinphos (2000 µg/mL). All bioassays were performed in at least triplicate and are expressed as mean ± standard deviation

Mentions: The S. jambos leaf extract was diluted to 2000 mg/mL in artificial seawater for toxicity testing, resulting in a 1000-mg/ mL concentration in the Artemia franciscana lethality bioassay [Figure 1a]. For comparison, the reference toxins potassium dichromate (800µg/mL) [Figure 1b] and Mevinphos (2000µg/mL) [Figure 1c] were also tested in the Artemia franciscana lethality bioassay. Both reference toxins were more rapid in their induction of the onset of mortality than the S. jambos leaf extract at the concentrations tested. For the reference toxins, the induction of mortality was seen within the first 3 hours of exposure. One hundred percent mortality was evident following 4 hours of exposure. In contrast, a period of 6 hours was required for S. jambos extract to induce the onset of mortality, and 24 hours was required to kill 100% of the brine shrimp.


Bioactivity of Syzygium jambos methanolic extracts: Antibacterial activity and toxicity.

Mohanty S, Cock IE - Pharmacognosy Res (2010)

Brine shrimp lethality of (a) S. jambos leaf extract (1000 µg/ mL), (b) potassium dichromate (800 µg/mL) and (c) Mevinphos (2000 µg/mL). All bioassays were performed in at least triplicate and are expressed as mean ± standard deviation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140127&req=5

Figure 1: Brine shrimp lethality of (a) S. jambos leaf extract (1000 µg/ mL), (b) potassium dichromate (800 µg/mL) and (c) Mevinphos (2000 µg/mL). All bioassays were performed in at least triplicate and are expressed as mean ± standard deviation
Mentions: The S. jambos leaf extract was diluted to 2000 mg/mL in artificial seawater for toxicity testing, resulting in a 1000-mg/ mL concentration in the Artemia franciscana lethality bioassay [Figure 1a]. For comparison, the reference toxins potassium dichromate (800µg/mL) [Figure 1b] and Mevinphos (2000µg/mL) [Figure 1c] were also tested in the Artemia franciscana lethality bioassay. Both reference toxins were more rapid in their induction of the onset of mortality than the S. jambos leaf extract at the concentrations tested. For the reference toxins, the induction of mortality was seen within the first 3 hours of exposure. One hundred percent mortality was evident following 4 hours of exposure. In contrast, a period of 6 hours was required for S. jambos extract to induce the onset of mortality, and 24 hours was required to kill 100% of the brine shrimp.

Bottom Line: Methanol extracts from S. jambos leaves were tested for antimicrobial activity and toxicity.The leaf extract also proved to be toxic in the Artemia franciscana bioassay, with a 48-h LC(50) of 387.9 ± 38.8 µg/mL, making it slightly more toxic than Mevinphos (505.3± 37.7 µg/mL) and approximately 5-fold less toxic than potassium dichromate (80.4 ± 4.3 µg/mL).Whilst potassium dichromate's LC(50) remained constant across the 72-hour test period (24-h LC(50), 86.3 ± 5.1; 72-h LC(50), 77.9 ± 4.9), the extract and Mevinphos LC(50) values decreased by 72 hours (87.0 ± 11.3 µg/mL and 103.9 ± 12.8 µg/mL, respectively), indicating their similar levels of toxicity in the assay.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Rd., Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland 4111, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Methanol extracts from S. jambos leaves were tested for antimicrobial activity and toxicity. S. jambos leaf extract inhibited the growth of 4 of the 14 bacteria tested (29%). Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial growths were inhibited by S. jambos leaf extract, although gram-positive bacteria appeared more susceptible. Two of the 10 gram-negative bacteria (20%) and 2 of the 4 gram-positive bacteria (50%) tested had their growths inhibited by the extract. The leaf extract also proved to be toxic in the Artemia franciscana bioassay, with a 48-h LC(50) of 387.9 ± 38.8 µg/mL, making it slightly more toxic than Mevinphos (505.3± 37.7 µg/mL) and approximately 5-fold less toxic than potassium dichromate (80.4 ± 4.3 µg/mL). Whilst potassium dichromate's LC(50) remained constant across the 72-hour test period (24-h LC(50), 86.3 ± 5.1; 72-h LC(50), 77.9 ± 4.9), the extract and Mevinphos LC(50) values decreased by 72 hours (87.0 ± 11.3 µg/mL and 103.9 ± 12.8 µg/mL, respectively), indicating their similar levels of toxicity in the assay.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus