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Antimicrobial properties, antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds from six wild edible mushrooms of western ghats of Karnataka, India.

Ramesh Ch, Pattar MG - Pharmacognosy Res (2010)

Bottom Line: All the isolates showed high phenol and flavonoid content, but ascorbic acid content was found in traces.Antioxidant efficiency by inhibitory concentration on 1,1-Diphenly-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) was found significant when compared to standard antioxidant like Buthylated hydroxyanisol (BHA).These results are discussed in relation to therapeutic value of the studied mushrooms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mycology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003, Karnataka, India.

ABSTRACT
Methanolic extracts of 6 wild edible mushrooms isolated from the Western Ghats of Karnataka were used in this study. Among the isolates (Lycoperdon perlatum, Cantharellus cibarius, Clavaria vermiculris, Ramaria formosa, Marasmius oreades, Pleurotus pulmonarius), only 4 showed satisfactory results. Quantitative analysis of bioactive components revealed that total phenols are the major bioactive component found in extracts of isolates expressed as mg of GAE per gram of fruit body, which ranged from 3.20 ± 0.05 mg/mL to 6.25 ± 0.08 mg/mL. Average concentration of flavonoid ranged from 0.40 ± 0.052 mg/mL to 2.54 ± 0.08 mg/mL; followed by very small concentration of ascorbic acid (range, 0.06 ± 0.01 mg/mL to 0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL) in all the isolates. All the isolates showed high phenol and flavonoid content, but ascorbic acid content was found in traces. Antioxidant efficiency by inhibitory concentration on 1,1-Diphenly-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) was found significant when compared to standard antioxidant like Buthylated hydroxyanisol (BHA). The concentration (IC(50)) ranged from 0.94 ± 0.27 mg/mL to 7.57 ± 0.21 mg/mL. Determination of antimicrobial activity profile of all the isolates tested against a panel of standard pathogenic bacteria and fungi indicated that the concentrations of bioactive components directly influence the antimicrobial capability of the isolates. Agar diffusion assay showed considerable activity against all bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of the extracts of 4 isolates showed that they are also active even in least concentrations. These results are discussed in relation to therapeutic value of the studied mushrooms.

No MeSH data available.


Activity (IC50 in mg/mL) concentration of mushroom extracts Lp - Lycoperdon perlatum; Cc - Cantharellus cibarius; Cv - Clavaria vermiculris; Rf - Ramaria Formosa; M o - Marasmius oreades; Pp - Pleurotus pulmonarius; BHA - butylated hydroxytoluene (synthetic antioxidant). Error bars are standard error values of the mean denotes significantly (P> 0.05) different
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Figure 2: Activity (IC50 in mg/mL) concentration of mushroom extracts Lp - Lycoperdon perlatum; Cc - Cantharellus cibarius; Cv - Clavaria vermiculris; Rf - Ramaria Formosa; M o - Marasmius oreades; Pp - Pleurotus pulmonarius; BHA - butylated hydroxytoluene (synthetic antioxidant). Error bars are standard error values of the mean denotes significantly (P> 0.05) different

Mentions: DPPH scavenging assay was measured at 517 nm. Positive DPPH test suggests that methanolic extracts of all the samples were scavengers of free radicals. The 50% of inhibition values (IC50) ranged from 0.94 ± 0.27 to 7.57 ± 0.21 mg/mL). The RSAs of BHA and isolates on DPPH radical are compared and shown in Figure 2. Among the studied concentrations, RSA was significant in L. perlatum (0.94 ± 0.27 mg/mL), followed by P. pulmonarius (1.62 ± 0.2 mg/mL). Other isolates showed satisfactory RSA in C. vermiculris (2.63 ± 0.14 mg/mL) and M. oreades (3.54 ± 0.18 mg/mL), and the remaining 2 isolates showed vestigial RSA when compared with commonly used synthetic antioxidant BHA (0.80 ± 0.00 mg/mL). According to Barros et al,[10] A. silvaticus was the most efficient species, showing higher value (5.37 ± 0.06 mg/mL), while A. arvensis presented lower antioxidant properties, with lower (15.85 ± 0.27 mg/mL) concentration, which is compatible to its lower phenols content. EC50 values of the extracts in DPPH radical scavenging of the fresh fruit body, oven-dried fruit body, freeze-dried fruit body and mycelium extracts were approximately 3.75, 5.81, 8.67 and 13.67 mg/mL, respectively, whereas that of BHA was 0.0126 mg/mL.[5] When the reaction time was kept at 1 minute, DPPH activity ranged between 15% (Pleurotus eryngii) and 70% (Ganoderma lucidum); while with a reaction time of 30 minutes, DPPH activity ranged between 5% (Pleurotus eryngii) and 78% (Agaricus bisporus). Overall, medicinal mushrooms had a higher DPPH activity than edible mushrooms.[14] Scavenging activities of D. indusiata were well pronounced at concentrations of 0.5 to 2 mg/mL. The free radical scavenging effect of WE was slightly higher than that of BHA at concentrations of 0.5 to 2 mg/mL.[11]


Antimicrobial properties, antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds from six wild edible mushrooms of western ghats of Karnataka, India.

Ramesh Ch, Pattar MG - Pharmacognosy Res (2010)

Activity (IC50 in mg/mL) concentration of mushroom extracts Lp - Lycoperdon perlatum; Cc - Cantharellus cibarius; Cv - Clavaria vermiculris; Rf - Ramaria Formosa; M o - Marasmius oreades; Pp - Pleurotus pulmonarius; BHA - butylated hydroxytoluene (synthetic antioxidant). Error bars are standard error values of the mean denotes significantly (P> 0.05) different
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140106&req=5

Figure 2: Activity (IC50 in mg/mL) concentration of mushroom extracts Lp - Lycoperdon perlatum; Cc - Cantharellus cibarius; Cv - Clavaria vermiculris; Rf - Ramaria Formosa; M o - Marasmius oreades; Pp - Pleurotus pulmonarius; BHA - butylated hydroxytoluene (synthetic antioxidant). Error bars are standard error values of the mean denotes significantly (P> 0.05) different
Mentions: DPPH scavenging assay was measured at 517 nm. Positive DPPH test suggests that methanolic extracts of all the samples were scavengers of free radicals. The 50% of inhibition values (IC50) ranged from 0.94 ± 0.27 to 7.57 ± 0.21 mg/mL). The RSAs of BHA and isolates on DPPH radical are compared and shown in Figure 2. Among the studied concentrations, RSA was significant in L. perlatum (0.94 ± 0.27 mg/mL), followed by P. pulmonarius (1.62 ± 0.2 mg/mL). Other isolates showed satisfactory RSA in C. vermiculris (2.63 ± 0.14 mg/mL) and M. oreades (3.54 ± 0.18 mg/mL), and the remaining 2 isolates showed vestigial RSA when compared with commonly used synthetic antioxidant BHA (0.80 ± 0.00 mg/mL). According to Barros et al,[10] A. silvaticus was the most efficient species, showing higher value (5.37 ± 0.06 mg/mL), while A. arvensis presented lower antioxidant properties, with lower (15.85 ± 0.27 mg/mL) concentration, which is compatible to its lower phenols content. EC50 values of the extracts in DPPH radical scavenging of the fresh fruit body, oven-dried fruit body, freeze-dried fruit body and mycelium extracts were approximately 3.75, 5.81, 8.67 and 13.67 mg/mL, respectively, whereas that of BHA was 0.0126 mg/mL.[5] When the reaction time was kept at 1 minute, DPPH activity ranged between 15% (Pleurotus eryngii) and 70% (Ganoderma lucidum); while with a reaction time of 30 minutes, DPPH activity ranged between 5% (Pleurotus eryngii) and 78% (Agaricus bisporus). Overall, medicinal mushrooms had a higher DPPH activity than edible mushrooms.[14] Scavenging activities of D. indusiata were well pronounced at concentrations of 0.5 to 2 mg/mL. The free radical scavenging effect of WE was slightly higher than that of BHA at concentrations of 0.5 to 2 mg/mL.[11]

Bottom Line: All the isolates showed high phenol and flavonoid content, but ascorbic acid content was found in traces.Antioxidant efficiency by inhibitory concentration on 1,1-Diphenly-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) was found significant when compared to standard antioxidant like Buthylated hydroxyanisol (BHA).These results are discussed in relation to therapeutic value of the studied mushrooms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mycology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003, Karnataka, India.

ABSTRACT
Methanolic extracts of 6 wild edible mushrooms isolated from the Western Ghats of Karnataka were used in this study. Among the isolates (Lycoperdon perlatum, Cantharellus cibarius, Clavaria vermiculris, Ramaria formosa, Marasmius oreades, Pleurotus pulmonarius), only 4 showed satisfactory results. Quantitative analysis of bioactive components revealed that total phenols are the major bioactive component found in extracts of isolates expressed as mg of GAE per gram of fruit body, which ranged from 3.20 ± 0.05 mg/mL to 6.25 ± 0.08 mg/mL. Average concentration of flavonoid ranged from 0.40 ± 0.052 mg/mL to 2.54 ± 0.08 mg/mL; followed by very small concentration of ascorbic acid (range, 0.06 ± 0.01 mg/mL to 0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL) in all the isolates. All the isolates showed high phenol and flavonoid content, but ascorbic acid content was found in traces. Antioxidant efficiency by inhibitory concentration on 1,1-Diphenly-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) was found significant when compared to standard antioxidant like Buthylated hydroxyanisol (BHA). The concentration (IC(50)) ranged from 0.94 ± 0.27 mg/mL to 7.57 ± 0.21 mg/mL. Determination of antimicrobial activity profile of all the isolates tested against a panel of standard pathogenic bacteria and fungi indicated that the concentrations of bioactive components directly influence the antimicrobial capability of the isolates. Agar diffusion assay showed considerable activity against all bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of the extracts of 4 isolates showed that they are also active even in least concentrations. These results are discussed in relation to therapeutic value of the studied mushrooms.

No MeSH data available.