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An herbal nasal drop enhanced frontal and anterior cingulate cortex activity.

Chan AS, Cheung MC, Sze SL, Leung WW, Shi D - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Bottom Line: The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities).The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC.Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities). A repeated-measures design was used. Fourteen normal adults were administered herbal remedy and saline solution intranasally on separate sessions. Two intervals of eyes-closed resting EEG data were obtained individually before and after each administration. Results showed that only the herbal remedy but not the saline solution induced elevation in cordance, an index correlated with cerebral perfusion, in the anterior brain region. In addition, the activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as examined by the LORETA analysis, was also increased after the application of the herbal remedy but not saline solution. The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC. Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Enhanced theta current density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) after the administration of the herbal nasal drop (a), but not the saline nasal drop (b), as analyzed by the voxel-by-voxel paired t statistics with low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), t(13) = 2.65, P < .025. The figure shows the sagittal images at the level of maximal differences between the baseline and the post-intranasal administration time points. The x, y and z Talairach coordinates are −3, 31 and 22, respectively. Red color indicates the source location of significantly increased electrical activity in the brain at post-intranasal administration.
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fig3: Enhanced theta current density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) after the administration of the herbal nasal drop (a), but not the saline nasal drop (b), as analyzed by the voxel-by-voxel paired t statistics with low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), t(13) = 2.65, P < .025. The figure shows the sagittal images at the level of maximal differences between the baseline and the post-intranasal administration time points. The x, y and z Talairach coordinates are −3, 31 and 22, respectively. Red color indicates the source location of significantly increased electrical activity in the brain at post-intranasal administration.

Mentions: Further to the previous analysis of theta cordance as a measure of the general level of activity of the frontal cortex, we also focused specifically on the activity of the ACC. The LORETA voxel-by-voxel paired t-test with subject-wise normalization on the log-transformed data was performed separately for the herbal and saline nasal drop conditions. With repeated tests performed, the alpha was set at 0.025 with Bonferroni adjustment, and the corresponding significant t-threshold was at 2.65 (df = 13). Figure 3 shows the graphical representation of the LORETA t-statistics separately for each nasal drop condition. It was found that administration of the herbal nasal drop was associated with a significant increase in theta source activity maximally at the ACC (BA 24 and 32) (t = 4.02, P < .025), while no such increase was observed for the saline condition (P = .07). In addition to ACC activation, an increase in theta source activity associated with herbal nasal drop was also found in some frontal structures, including the middle and superior frontal gyri (BA 8 and 10) (P < .025).


An herbal nasal drop enhanced frontal and anterior cingulate cortex activity.

Chan AS, Cheung MC, Sze SL, Leung WW, Shi D - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Enhanced theta current density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) after the administration of the herbal nasal drop (a), but not the saline nasal drop (b), as analyzed by the voxel-by-voxel paired t statistics with low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), t(13) = 2.65, P < .025. The figure shows the sagittal images at the level of maximal differences between the baseline and the post-intranasal administration time points. The x, y and z Talairach coordinates are −3, 31 and 22, respectively. Red color indicates the source location of significantly increased electrical activity in the brain at post-intranasal administration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140066&req=5

fig3: Enhanced theta current density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) after the administration of the herbal nasal drop (a), but not the saline nasal drop (b), as analyzed by the voxel-by-voxel paired t statistics with low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), t(13) = 2.65, P < .025. The figure shows the sagittal images at the level of maximal differences between the baseline and the post-intranasal administration time points. The x, y and z Talairach coordinates are −3, 31 and 22, respectively. Red color indicates the source location of significantly increased electrical activity in the brain at post-intranasal administration.
Mentions: Further to the previous analysis of theta cordance as a measure of the general level of activity of the frontal cortex, we also focused specifically on the activity of the ACC. The LORETA voxel-by-voxel paired t-test with subject-wise normalization on the log-transformed data was performed separately for the herbal and saline nasal drop conditions. With repeated tests performed, the alpha was set at 0.025 with Bonferroni adjustment, and the corresponding significant t-threshold was at 2.65 (df = 13). Figure 3 shows the graphical representation of the LORETA t-statistics separately for each nasal drop condition. It was found that administration of the herbal nasal drop was associated with a significant increase in theta source activity maximally at the ACC (BA 24 and 32) (t = 4.02, P < .025), while no such increase was observed for the saline condition (P = .07). In addition to ACC activation, an increase in theta source activity associated with herbal nasal drop was also found in some frontal structures, including the middle and superior frontal gyri (BA 8 and 10) (P < .025).

Bottom Line: The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities).The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC.Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities). A repeated-measures design was used. Fourteen normal adults were administered herbal remedy and saline solution intranasally on separate sessions. Two intervals of eyes-closed resting EEG data were obtained individually before and after each administration. Results showed that only the herbal remedy but not the saline solution induced elevation in cordance, an index correlated with cerebral perfusion, in the anterior brain region. In addition, the activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as examined by the LORETA analysis, was also increased after the application of the herbal remedy but not saline solution. The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC. Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

No MeSH data available.