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An herbal nasal drop enhanced frontal and anterior cingulate cortex activity.

Chan AS, Cheung MC, Sze SL, Leung WW, Shi D - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Bottom Line: The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities).The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC.Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities). A repeated-measures design was used. Fourteen normal adults were administered herbal remedy and saline solution intranasally on separate sessions. Two intervals of eyes-closed resting EEG data were obtained individually before and after each administration. Results showed that only the herbal remedy but not the saline solution induced elevation in cordance, an index correlated with cerebral perfusion, in the anterior brain region. In addition, the activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as examined by the LORETA analysis, was also increased after the application of the herbal remedy but not saline solution. The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC. Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Graphical illustration of the sagittal view of frontal lobe (in yellow) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in blue) in a human brain.
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fig1: Graphical illustration of the sagittal view of frontal lobe (in yellow) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in blue) in a human brain.

Mentions: Consistent results were obtained from a pilot study on a group of children with frontal lobe dysfunction who demonstrated impairment on spontaneous speech output, inhibition on repetitive speech and initiation of behavior. Six children were administered herbal nasal drop intranasally for a month, and six age- and intelligence-matched children received a saline solution as control. Treatment-related changes were rated by their parents who were blinded to the group assignment, on an 11-point rating scale (from −5 to +5), where negative rating indicated deterioration, positive rating indicated improvement and zero indicated no change. Initial findings indicated that the treatment group, as compared with the control group, showed significantly greater improvement in spontaneous speech output (mean score: treatment group = 2.24, control group = 0.09, P < .01), inhibition on repetitive speech (mean score: treatment group = 1.14, control group = 0, P < .05) and initiation of behavior (mean score: treatment group = 2.6, control group = 0.33, P < .05). Thus, these encouraging results of our pilot data on both adult and children patients with frontal lobe dysfunction suggested that this herbal formula may have a positive effect on frontal lobe dysfunction. While the clinical trails are on-going, the present study aimed to study the brain activities underlying the intervention effect of this herbal medicine using neuro-eletrophysiological methods. The frontal lobe and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (Figure 1) were chosen as two regions of interest as they are significant in mediating frontal lobe function.


An herbal nasal drop enhanced frontal and anterior cingulate cortex activity.

Chan AS, Cheung MC, Sze SL, Leung WW, Shi D - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Graphical illustration of the sagittal view of frontal lobe (in yellow) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in blue) in a human brain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140066&req=5

fig1: Graphical illustration of the sagittal view of frontal lobe (in yellow) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in blue) in a human brain.
Mentions: Consistent results were obtained from a pilot study on a group of children with frontal lobe dysfunction who demonstrated impairment on spontaneous speech output, inhibition on repetitive speech and initiation of behavior. Six children were administered herbal nasal drop intranasally for a month, and six age- and intelligence-matched children received a saline solution as control. Treatment-related changes were rated by their parents who were blinded to the group assignment, on an 11-point rating scale (from −5 to +5), where negative rating indicated deterioration, positive rating indicated improvement and zero indicated no change. Initial findings indicated that the treatment group, as compared with the control group, showed significantly greater improvement in spontaneous speech output (mean score: treatment group = 2.24, control group = 0.09, P < .01), inhibition on repetitive speech (mean score: treatment group = 1.14, control group = 0, P < .05) and initiation of behavior (mean score: treatment group = 2.6, control group = 0.33, P < .05). Thus, these encouraging results of our pilot data on both adult and children patients with frontal lobe dysfunction suggested that this herbal formula may have a positive effect on frontal lobe dysfunction. While the clinical trails are on-going, the present study aimed to study the brain activities underlying the intervention effect of this herbal medicine using neuro-eletrophysiological methods. The frontal lobe and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (Figure 1) were chosen as two regions of interest as they are significant in mediating frontal lobe function.

Bottom Line: The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities).The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC.Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
The present study examined the neuro-electrophysiological activity of the brain associated with the application of a herbal remedy developed by a Shaolin monk based upon the Chan healing principle of clearing the orifices (i.e., the nasal cavities). A repeated-measures design was used. Fourteen normal adults were administered herbal remedy and saline solution intranasally on separate sessions. Two intervals of eyes-closed resting EEG data were obtained individually before and after each administration. Results showed that only the herbal remedy but not the saline solution induced elevation in cordance, an index correlated with cerebral perfusion, in the anterior brain region. In addition, the activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as examined by the LORETA analysis, was also increased after the application of the herbal remedy but not saline solution. The present study provided some preliminary evidence suggesting that the herbal nasal drop enhanced the activity of the frontal lobe and ACC. Implications for the potential clinical application of the herbal remedy to treat patients with frontal lobe disorders were discussed.

No MeSH data available.