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Acupuncture to treat primary dysmenorrhea in women: a randomized controlled trial.

Smith CA, Crowther CA, Petrucco O, Beilby J, Dent H - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Women receiving acupuncture reported a small reduction in mood changes compared with the control group, relative risk (RR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-1.00, P = .05.Follow-up at 6 months found a significant reduction in the duration of menstrual pain in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, mean difference -9.6, 95% CI -18.9 to -0.3, P = .04, and the need for additional analgesia was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, P = .03, but the follow-up at 12 months found lack of treatment effect.To conclude, although acupuncture improved menstrual mood symptoms in women with primary dysmenorrhea during the treatment phase, the trend in the improvement of symptoms during the active phase of treatment, and at 6 and 12 months was non-significant, indicating that a small treatment effect from acupuncture on dysmenorrhea may exist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
We examined the effectiveness of acupuncture to reduce the severity and intensity of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized controlled trial compared acupuncture with control acupuncture using a placebo needle. Eligible women were aged 14-25 years with a diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea. Women received nine sessions of the study treatment over 3 months. The primary outcomes were menstrual pain intensity and duration, overall improvement in dysmenorrhea symptoms and reduced need for additional analgesia, measured at 3, 6 and 12 months from trial entry. A total of 92 women were randomly assigned to the intervention (acupuncture n = 46 and control n = 46). At 3 months although pain outcomes were lower for women in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, there was no significant difference between groups. Women receiving acupuncture reported a small reduction in mood changes compared with the control group, relative risk (RR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-1.00, P = .05. Follow-up at 6 months found a significant reduction in the duration of menstrual pain in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, mean difference -9.6, 95% CI -18.9 to -0.3, P = .04, and the need for additional analgesia was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, P = .03, but the follow-up at 12 months found lack of treatment effect. To conclude, although acupuncture improved menstrual mood symptoms in women with primary dysmenorrhea during the treatment phase, the trend in the improvement of symptoms during the active phase of treatment, and at 6 and 12 months was non-significant, indicating that a small treatment effect from acupuncture on dysmenorrhea may exist. In the study, acupuncture was acceptable and safe, but further appropriately powered trials are needed before recommendations for clinical practice can be made.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of women experiencing other menstrual symptoms.
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fig4: Percentage of women experiencing other menstrual symptoms.

Mentions: Unadjusted and adjusted analyses are reported for primary outcomes (Table 2). At the end of the 3 months treatment phase although the pain outcomes were marginally lower for women in acupuncture group, there were no significant differences between groups (Figure 2). Women reported fewer mood changes in the acupuncture group (53%) compared with the control group (72%), 0.72, 95% CI 0.53–1.00, P = .05, (Figure 3). Six months following trial entry, there was a significant reduction in the duration of menstrual pain in the acupuncture group (30 h) compared with the control group (39 h), P = .04, and a reduced need for additional analgesia in the acupuncture (54%) compared with the control group (82%), 0.69, 95% CI 0.49–0.96, P = .03. The intensity of pain was lower for women receiving acupuncture, but not significantly different to the control group. At the 12-month follow-up, the earlier improvements reported by women in the acupuncture group were no longer sustained, and there were no differences between groups. The intensity of menstrual pain, duration of pain and the presence of other menstrual symptoms (Figure 4) reduced over time from trial entry for both groups.


Acupuncture to treat primary dysmenorrhea in women: a randomized controlled trial.

Smith CA, Crowther CA, Petrucco O, Beilby J, Dent H - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Percentage of women experiencing other menstrual symptoms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3140031&req=5

fig4: Percentage of women experiencing other menstrual symptoms.
Mentions: Unadjusted and adjusted analyses are reported for primary outcomes (Table 2). At the end of the 3 months treatment phase although the pain outcomes were marginally lower for women in acupuncture group, there were no significant differences between groups (Figure 2). Women reported fewer mood changes in the acupuncture group (53%) compared with the control group (72%), 0.72, 95% CI 0.53–1.00, P = .05, (Figure 3). Six months following trial entry, there was a significant reduction in the duration of menstrual pain in the acupuncture group (30 h) compared with the control group (39 h), P = .04, and a reduced need for additional analgesia in the acupuncture (54%) compared with the control group (82%), 0.69, 95% CI 0.49–0.96, P = .03. The intensity of pain was lower for women receiving acupuncture, but not significantly different to the control group. At the 12-month follow-up, the earlier improvements reported by women in the acupuncture group were no longer sustained, and there were no differences between groups. The intensity of menstrual pain, duration of pain and the presence of other menstrual symptoms (Figure 4) reduced over time from trial entry for both groups.

Bottom Line: Women receiving acupuncture reported a small reduction in mood changes compared with the control group, relative risk (RR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-1.00, P = .05.Follow-up at 6 months found a significant reduction in the duration of menstrual pain in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, mean difference -9.6, 95% CI -18.9 to -0.3, P = .04, and the need for additional analgesia was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, P = .03, but the follow-up at 12 months found lack of treatment effect.To conclude, although acupuncture improved menstrual mood symptoms in women with primary dysmenorrhea during the treatment phase, the trend in the improvement of symptoms during the active phase of treatment, and at 6 and 12 months was non-significant, indicating that a small treatment effect from acupuncture on dysmenorrhea may exist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Complementary Medicine Research, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
We examined the effectiveness of acupuncture to reduce the severity and intensity of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized controlled trial compared acupuncture with control acupuncture using a placebo needle. Eligible women were aged 14-25 years with a diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea. Women received nine sessions of the study treatment over 3 months. The primary outcomes were menstrual pain intensity and duration, overall improvement in dysmenorrhea symptoms and reduced need for additional analgesia, measured at 3, 6 and 12 months from trial entry. A total of 92 women were randomly assigned to the intervention (acupuncture n = 46 and control n = 46). At 3 months although pain outcomes were lower for women in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, there was no significant difference between groups. Women receiving acupuncture reported a small reduction in mood changes compared with the control group, relative risk (RR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-1.00, P = .05. Follow-up at 6 months found a significant reduction in the duration of menstrual pain in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, mean difference -9.6, 95% CI -18.9 to -0.3, P = .04, and the need for additional analgesia was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared with the control group, RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.96, P = .03, but the follow-up at 12 months found lack of treatment effect. To conclude, although acupuncture improved menstrual mood symptoms in women with primary dysmenorrhea during the treatment phase, the trend in the improvement of symptoms during the active phase of treatment, and at 6 and 12 months was non-significant, indicating that a small treatment effect from acupuncture on dysmenorrhea may exist. In the study, acupuncture was acceptable and safe, but further appropriately powered trials are needed before recommendations for clinical practice can be made.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus