Limits...
Mumijo traditional medicine: fossil deposits from antarctica (chemical composition and beneficial bioactivity).

Aiello A, Fattorusso E, Menna M, Vitalone R, Schröder HC, Müller WE - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Extensive purification and chemical analysis revealed that the fossil samples are a mixture of glycerol derivatives.In addition, the fraction rich in glycerol ethers/wax esters displayed a significant growth-promoting activity in permanent neuronal PC12 cells.It is concluded that this new Mumijo preparation has distinct and marked neuroprotective activity, very likely due to the content of glycerol ether derivatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Chimica delle Sostanze Naturali, Università di Napoli "Federico II", via D. Montesano 49, 80131 Napoli, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Mumijo is a widely used traditional medicine, especially in Russia, Altai Mountains, Mongolia, Iran Kasachstan and in Kirgistan. Mumijo preparations have been successfully used for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases; they display immune-stimulating and antiallergic activity as well. In the present study, we investigate the chemical composition and the biomedical potential of a Mumijo(-related) product collected from the Antarctica. The yellow material originates from the snow petrels, Pagodroma nivea. Extensive purification and chemical analysis revealed that the fossil samples are a mixture of glycerol derivatives. In vitro experiments showed that the Mumijo extract caused in cortical neurons a strong neuroprotective effect against the apoptosis-inducing amyloid peptide fragment β-fragment 25-35 (Aβ25-35). In addition, the fraction rich in glycerol ethers/wax esters displayed a significant growth-promoting activity in permanent neuronal PC12 cells. It is concluded that this new Mumijo preparation has distinct and marked neuroprotective activity, very likely due to the content of glycerol ether derivatives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of Mumijo extract on Aβ25–35-induced cell toxicity. Neurons have been treated with 1 μM of Aβ25–35 for 5 days. During this period the viability of the cells dropped from 100% (hatched bar) to 28% (solid black bar) if no Mumijo extract had been added. However, if the cultures had been pre-incubated with increasing concentrations of Mumijo extract (3–100 μg/ml) the β25–35-induced cell toxicity is reduced. Control values are set to 100% (hatched bar); n = 10. The means ± SEM are given. *P < .001 [versus controls (plus Aβ 25–35)]. Cell viability was determined applying the MTT assay procedure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139983&req=5

fig2: Effect of Mumijo extract on Aβ25–35-induced cell toxicity. Neurons have been treated with 1 μM of Aβ25–35 for 5 days. During this period the viability of the cells dropped from 100% (hatched bar) to 28% (solid black bar) if no Mumijo extract had been added. However, if the cultures had been pre-incubated with increasing concentrations of Mumijo extract (3–100 μg/ml) the β25–35-induced cell toxicity is reduced. Control values are set to 100% (hatched bar); n = 10. The means ± SEM are given. *P < .001 [versus controls (plus Aβ 25–35)]. Cell viability was determined applying the MTT assay procedure.

Mentions: The toxic effect of the Aβ fragment, Aβ25–35, was assessed in primary rat cortical neurons. Application of the fragment at a concentration of 1 μM caused within the 5-day incubation period a significant reduction of viable cells to 27.8 ± 6.1% (P < .001). Mumijo extract alone was found to have no effect on the viability of the neurons. However, if the neurons were pre-incubated with Mumijo extract prior to addition of the Aβ25–35, a significant higher cell viability was determined (Figure 2). At concentrations of 3 μg/ml or higher of Mumijo extract, the percentage of viable cells increased from 27.8 ± 6.1% (in the absence of extract) to 98.6 ± 9.3% (10 μg/ml) and 82.4 ± 8.9% (30 μg/ml) (P < .001), respectively. The neuroprotective effect displayed by the Mumijo extract was still significant at 1 μg/ml (not shown).


Mumijo traditional medicine: fossil deposits from antarctica (chemical composition and beneficial bioactivity).

Aiello A, Fattorusso E, Menna M, Vitalone R, Schröder HC, Müller WE - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2010)

Effect of Mumijo extract on Aβ25–35-induced cell toxicity. Neurons have been treated with 1 μM of Aβ25–35 for 5 days. During this period the viability of the cells dropped from 100% (hatched bar) to 28% (solid black bar) if no Mumijo extract had been added. However, if the cultures had been pre-incubated with increasing concentrations of Mumijo extract (3–100 μg/ml) the β25–35-induced cell toxicity is reduced. Control values are set to 100% (hatched bar); n = 10. The means ± SEM are given. *P < .001 [versus controls (plus Aβ 25–35)]. Cell viability was determined applying the MTT assay procedure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139983&req=5

fig2: Effect of Mumijo extract on Aβ25–35-induced cell toxicity. Neurons have been treated with 1 μM of Aβ25–35 for 5 days. During this period the viability of the cells dropped from 100% (hatched bar) to 28% (solid black bar) if no Mumijo extract had been added. However, if the cultures had been pre-incubated with increasing concentrations of Mumijo extract (3–100 μg/ml) the β25–35-induced cell toxicity is reduced. Control values are set to 100% (hatched bar); n = 10. The means ± SEM are given. *P < .001 [versus controls (plus Aβ 25–35)]. Cell viability was determined applying the MTT assay procedure.
Mentions: The toxic effect of the Aβ fragment, Aβ25–35, was assessed in primary rat cortical neurons. Application of the fragment at a concentration of 1 μM caused within the 5-day incubation period a significant reduction of viable cells to 27.8 ± 6.1% (P < .001). Mumijo extract alone was found to have no effect on the viability of the neurons. However, if the neurons were pre-incubated with Mumijo extract prior to addition of the Aβ25–35, a significant higher cell viability was determined (Figure 2). At concentrations of 3 μg/ml or higher of Mumijo extract, the percentage of viable cells increased from 27.8 ± 6.1% (in the absence of extract) to 98.6 ± 9.3% (10 μg/ml) and 82.4 ± 8.9% (30 μg/ml) (P < .001), respectively. The neuroprotective effect displayed by the Mumijo extract was still significant at 1 μg/ml (not shown).

Bottom Line: Extensive purification and chemical analysis revealed that the fossil samples are a mixture of glycerol derivatives.In addition, the fraction rich in glycerol ethers/wax esters displayed a significant growth-promoting activity in permanent neuronal PC12 cells.It is concluded that this new Mumijo preparation has distinct and marked neuroprotective activity, very likely due to the content of glycerol ether derivatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Chimica delle Sostanze Naturali, Università di Napoli "Federico II", via D. Montesano 49, 80131 Napoli, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Mumijo is a widely used traditional medicine, especially in Russia, Altai Mountains, Mongolia, Iran Kasachstan and in Kirgistan. Mumijo preparations have been successfully used for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases; they display immune-stimulating and antiallergic activity as well. In the present study, we investigate the chemical composition and the biomedical potential of a Mumijo(-related) product collected from the Antarctica. The yellow material originates from the snow petrels, Pagodroma nivea. Extensive purification and chemical analysis revealed that the fossil samples are a mixture of glycerol derivatives. In vitro experiments showed that the Mumijo extract caused in cortical neurons a strong neuroprotective effect against the apoptosis-inducing amyloid peptide fragment β-fragment 25-35 (Aβ25-35). In addition, the fraction rich in glycerol ethers/wax esters displayed a significant growth-promoting activity in permanent neuronal PC12 cells. It is concluded that this new Mumijo preparation has distinct and marked neuroprotective activity, very likely due to the content of glycerol ether derivatives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus