Limits...
Comparing the Support-Efficacy Model among Centenarians Living in Private Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, and Nursing Homes.

Randall GK, Martin P, Macdonald M, Margrett J, Bishop AJ, Poon LW - J Aging Res (2011)

Bottom Line: The hypothesized relationships among the models' variables were unique to each of the three groups; three different models fit the data depending upon residential environment.The direct and indirect effects of social relations assessments were positive for the mental and physical health of very old adults, suggesting that participants welcomed the support.However, residential status moderated the associations between the assessments of social relations, self-efficacy, and both outcomes, physical and mental health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625, USA.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the influence of social relations on health outcomes in very late life by examining the support-efficacy convoy model among older adults who resided in three different residential environments (centenarians in private homes, n = 126; centenarians in assisted living facilities, n = 55; centenarians in nursing homes, n = 105). For each group, path analytic models were employed to test our hypotheses; analyses controlled for sex, mental status, education, perceived economic sufficiency, and activities of daily living. The hypothesized relationships among the models' variables were unique to each of the three groups; three different models fit the data depending upon residential environment. The direct and indirect effects of social relations assessments were positive for the mental and physical health of very old adults, suggesting that participants welcomed the support. However, residential status moderated the associations between the assessments of social relations, self-efficacy, and both outcomes, physical and mental health.

No MeSH data available.


Test results for the support-efficacy model with centenarians residing in nursing homes; model fit: Satorra-Bentler χ2 (N = 105; df = 5) = 6.33; P = .28; CFI = .94; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .06 (using FIML). Parameter estimates are from the standardized solution; endogenous variables were controlled for mental status and education.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139897&req=5

fig4: Test results for the support-efficacy model with centenarians residing in nursing homes; model fit: Satorra-Bentler χ2 (N = 105; df = 5) = 6.33; P = .28; CFI = .94; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .06 (using FIML). Parameter estimates are from the standardized solution; endogenous variables were controlled for mental status and education.

Mentions: In the tested base model, neither exogenous predictor, social resources (β = .20; P > .05) nor social provisions (β = −.13; P > .05) significantly predicted self-efficacy. However, both self-efficacy (β = .60; P = .01) and social provisions (β = −1.09; P = .008) significantly predicted mental health, whereas only social provisions approached statistical significance predicting physical health (β = .77; P = .14). Regarding the magnitude of the standardized beta for social provisions, Jöreskog [62] noted that it is possible for a standardized coefficient to be greater than one (e.g., 1.04, 1.40, or 2.08) and that it does not necessarily imply error in the model. However, he did point out that such a finding likely points to multicollinearity in the data. Our measure of ADLs was negatively and highly correlated with social provisions (r = −.85) in this model. Thus, we deleted ADLs from the analysis and found that indeed social provisions significantly predicted physical health (β = .43; P = .02), neither measure of social resources predicted self-efficacy, and only self-efficacy predicted mental health (β = .70; P = .01). In this model, R2 for physical health was.29; for mental health it was.19, and for self-efficacy it was.84 (see Figure 4). In addition, both mental status and education were significant predictors of self-efficacy. Thus, as a supplemental analysis, we computed a model specifying the indirect effect from these control variables (mental status and education) to mental health through self-efficacy. The standardized indirect effect was.49 (P = .02).


Comparing the Support-Efficacy Model among Centenarians Living in Private Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, and Nursing Homes.

Randall GK, Martin P, Macdonald M, Margrett J, Bishop AJ, Poon LW - J Aging Res (2011)

Test results for the support-efficacy model with centenarians residing in nursing homes; model fit: Satorra-Bentler χ2 (N = 105; df = 5) = 6.33; P = .28; CFI = .94; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .06 (using FIML). Parameter estimates are from the standardized solution; endogenous variables were controlled for mental status and education.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139897&req=5

fig4: Test results for the support-efficacy model with centenarians residing in nursing homes; model fit: Satorra-Bentler χ2 (N = 105; df = 5) = 6.33; P = .28; CFI = .94; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .06 (using FIML). Parameter estimates are from the standardized solution; endogenous variables were controlled for mental status and education.
Mentions: In the tested base model, neither exogenous predictor, social resources (β = .20; P > .05) nor social provisions (β = −.13; P > .05) significantly predicted self-efficacy. However, both self-efficacy (β = .60; P = .01) and social provisions (β = −1.09; P = .008) significantly predicted mental health, whereas only social provisions approached statistical significance predicting physical health (β = .77; P = .14). Regarding the magnitude of the standardized beta for social provisions, Jöreskog [62] noted that it is possible for a standardized coefficient to be greater than one (e.g., 1.04, 1.40, or 2.08) and that it does not necessarily imply error in the model. However, he did point out that such a finding likely points to multicollinearity in the data. Our measure of ADLs was negatively and highly correlated with social provisions (r = −.85) in this model. Thus, we deleted ADLs from the analysis and found that indeed social provisions significantly predicted physical health (β = .43; P = .02), neither measure of social resources predicted self-efficacy, and only self-efficacy predicted mental health (β = .70; P = .01). In this model, R2 for physical health was.29; for mental health it was.19, and for self-efficacy it was.84 (see Figure 4). In addition, both mental status and education were significant predictors of self-efficacy. Thus, as a supplemental analysis, we computed a model specifying the indirect effect from these control variables (mental status and education) to mental health through self-efficacy. The standardized indirect effect was.49 (P = .02).

Bottom Line: The hypothesized relationships among the models' variables were unique to each of the three groups; three different models fit the data depending upon residential environment.The direct and indirect effects of social relations assessments were positive for the mental and physical health of very old adults, suggesting that participants welcomed the support.However, residential status moderated the associations between the assessments of social relations, self-efficacy, and both outcomes, physical and mental health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625, USA.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the influence of social relations on health outcomes in very late life by examining the support-efficacy convoy model among older adults who resided in three different residential environments (centenarians in private homes, n = 126; centenarians in assisted living facilities, n = 55; centenarians in nursing homes, n = 105). For each group, path analytic models were employed to test our hypotheses; analyses controlled for sex, mental status, education, perceived economic sufficiency, and activities of daily living. The hypothesized relationships among the models' variables were unique to each of the three groups; three different models fit the data depending upon residential environment. The direct and indirect effects of social relations assessments were positive for the mental and physical health of very old adults, suggesting that participants welcomed the support. However, residential status moderated the associations between the assessments of social relations, self-efficacy, and both outcomes, physical and mental health.

No MeSH data available.