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Optical coherence tomography of retinal and choroidal tumors.

Say EA, Shah SU, Ferenczy S, Shields CL - J Ophthalmol (2011)

Bottom Line: In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture.Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment.Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Suite 1440, 840 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

ABSTRACT
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized the field of ophthalmology since its introduction 20 years ago. Originally intended primarily for retina specialists to image the macula, it has found its role in other subspecialties that include glaucoma, cornea, and ocular oncology. In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture. Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment. With more advanced technology, OCT now provides imaging deeper into the choroid using a technique called enhanced depth imaging. This allows characterization of the thickness and reflective quality of small (<3 mm thick) choroidal lesions including choroidal nevus and melanoma. Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vitreoretinal lymphoma. (a, b) Bilateral vitreoretinal lymphoma with multifocal cream-colored subretinal infiltrates. (c) Time domain OCT of the right eye reveals multiple nodular elevations of the RPE from deposits in the sub-RPE space. (d) Time domain OCT of the left eye shows multiple dome-shaped elevations of the RPE from more extensive infiltrates and subretinal fluid.
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fig6: Vitreoretinal lymphoma. (a, b) Bilateral vitreoretinal lymphoma with multifocal cream-colored subretinal infiltrates. (c) Time domain OCT of the right eye reveals multiple nodular elevations of the RPE from deposits in the sub-RPE space. (d) Time domain OCT of the left eye shows multiple dome-shaped elevations of the RPE from more extensive infiltrates and subretinal fluid.

Mentions: Diagnosis of all intraocular lymphoid tumors should be done with a biopsy, either from an associated conjunctival or forniceal involvement or through vitrectomy and fine needle biopsy of the involved ocular tissue. Ancillary testing is not absolutely necessary although it can provide insight on the extent of involvement. OCT in vitreoretinal lymphomas may show dome-shaped elevations of the RPE or small nodular RPE irregularities from sub-RPE tumor deposits, retinal elevation or thickening from tumor infiltration, and cystoid macular edema from associated inflammatory reaction [38–40] (Figure 6). Fardeau and associates examined 61 eyes with vitreoretinal lymphoma confirmed through vitreous biopsies and found that 41.7% had nodular elevations of the RPE [40]. The authors also reported a significantly thinner central foveal thickness compared to eyes with posterior uveitis other than lymphoma [40]. OCT performed in choroidal lymphoma shows regular intermittent placoid choroidal thickening and loss of choriocapillaris [41]. The overlying RPE and neurosensory retina is unaffected and retains its regular, smooth contour [41].


Optical coherence tomography of retinal and choroidal tumors.

Say EA, Shah SU, Ferenczy S, Shields CL - J Ophthalmol (2011)

Vitreoretinal lymphoma. (a, b) Bilateral vitreoretinal lymphoma with multifocal cream-colored subretinal infiltrates. (c) Time domain OCT of the right eye reveals multiple nodular elevations of the RPE from deposits in the sub-RPE space. (d) Time domain OCT of the left eye shows multiple dome-shaped elevations of the RPE from more extensive infiltrates and subretinal fluid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139893&req=5

fig6: Vitreoretinal lymphoma. (a, b) Bilateral vitreoretinal lymphoma with multifocal cream-colored subretinal infiltrates. (c) Time domain OCT of the right eye reveals multiple nodular elevations of the RPE from deposits in the sub-RPE space. (d) Time domain OCT of the left eye shows multiple dome-shaped elevations of the RPE from more extensive infiltrates and subretinal fluid.
Mentions: Diagnosis of all intraocular lymphoid tumors should be done with a biopsy, either from an associated conjunctival or forniceal involvement or through vitrectomy and fine needle biopsy of the involved ocular tissue. Ancillary testing is not absolutely necessary although it can provide insight on the extent of involvement. OCT in vitreoretinal lymphomas may show dome-shaped elevations of the RPE or small nodular RPE irregularities from sub-RPE tumor deposits, retinal elevation or thickening from tumor infiltration, and cystoid macular edema from associated inflammatory reaction [38–40] (Figure 6). Fardeau and associates examined 61 eyes with vitreoretinal lymphoma confirmed through vitreous biopsies and found that 41.7% had nodular elevations of the RPE [40]. The authors also reported a significantly thinner central foveal thickness compared to eyes with posterior uveitis other than lymphoma [40]. OCT performed in choroidal lymphoma shows regular intermittent placoid choroidal thickening and loss of choriocapillaris [41]. The overlying RPE and neurosensory retina is unaffected and retains its regular, smooth contour [41].

Bottom Line: In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture.Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment.Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Suite 1440, 840 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

ABSTRACT
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized the field of ophthalmology since its introduction 20 years ago. Originally intended primarily for retina specialists to image the macula, it has found its role in other subspecialties that include glaucoma, cornea, and ocular oncology. In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture. Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment. With more advanced technology, OCT now provides imaging deeper into the choroid using a technique called enhanced depth imaging. This allows characterization of the thickness and reflective quality of small (<3 mm thick) choroidal lesions including choroidal nevus and melanoma. Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus