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Perioperative intravascular fluid assessment and monitoring: a narrative review of established and emerging techniques.

Singh S, Kuschner WG, Lighthall G - Anesthesiol Res Pract (2011)

Bottom Line: Accurate assessments of intravascular fluid status are an essential part of perioperative care and necessary in the management of the hemodynamically unstable patient.Goal-directed fluid management can facilitate resuscitation of the hypovolemic patient, reduce the risk of fluid overload, reduce the risk of the injudicious use of vasopressors and inotropes, and improve clinical outcomes.In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 757 Westwood Plaza, Suite 2231, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

ABSTRACT
Accurate assessments of intravascular fluid status are an essential part of perioperative care and necessary in the management of the hemodynamically unstable patient. Goal-directed fluid management can facilitate resuscitation of the hypovolemic patient, reduce the risk of fluid overload, reduce the risk of the injudicious use of vasopressors and inotropes, and improve clinical outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Arterial line tracings showing systolic pressure variation during the respiratory cycle. The pressure at end expiration defines baseline systolic pressure. SPV has two components, delta up and delta down, corresponding to systolic pressure waves reading at peak amplitude of early inspiration (the upward component or delta up) and at end inspiration (the downward component or delta down). The total amplitude variation or the sum of delta up and delta down is thus the SPV, shown with the arrow on the right of the diagram.
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fig2: Arterial line tracings showing systolic pressure variation during the respiratory cycle. The pressure at end expiration defines baseline systolic pressure. SPV has two components, delta up and delta down, corresponding to systolic pressure waves reading at peak amplitude of early inspiration (the upward component or delta up) and at end inspiration (the downward component or delta down). The total amplitude variation or the sum of delta up and delta down is thus the SPV, shown with the arrow on the right of the diagram.

Mentions: The range of blood pressure (difference between maximal and minimal systolic BP) during a single positive pressure breath is defined as SPV. The baseline systolic pressure is taken using a short apneic period. SPV has 2 components, delta up and delta down, corresponding to the difference between the baseline and the peak amplitude during early expiration and at end inspiration, respectively. SPV refers to the sum of delta up and delta down or the total amplitude variation (Figure 2).


Perioperative intravascular fluid assessment and monitoring: a narrative review of established and emerging techniques.

Singh S, Kuschner WG, Lighthall G - Anesthesiol Res Pract (2011)

Arterial line tracings showing systolic pressure variation during the respiratory cycle. The pressure at end expiration defines baseline systolic pressure. SPV has two components, delta up and delta down, corresponding to systolic pressure waves reading at peak amplitude of early inspiration (the upward component or delta up) and at end inspiration (the downward component or delta down). The total amplitude variation or the sum of delta up and delta down is thus the SPV, shown with the arrow on the right of the diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139886&req=5

fig2: Arterial line tracings showing systolic pressure variation during the respiratory cycle. The pressure at end expiration defines baseline systolic pressure. SPV has two components, delta up and delta down, corresponding to systolic pressure waves reading at peak amplitude of early inspiration (the upward component or delta up) and at end inspiration (the downward component or delta down). The total amplitude variation or the sum of delta up and delta down is thus the SPV, shown with the arrow on the right of the diagram.
Mentions: The range of blood pressure (difference between maximal and minimal systolic BP) during a single positive pressure breath is defined as SPV. The baseline systolic pressure is taken using a short apneic period. SPV has 2 components, delta up and delta down, corresponding to the difference between the baseline and the peak amplitude during early expiration and at end inspiration, respectively. SPV refers to the sum of delta up and delta down or the total amplitude variation (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Accurate assessments of intravascular fluid status are an essential part of perioperative care and necessary in the management of the hemodynamically unstable patient.Goal-directed fluid management can facilitate resuscitation of the hypovolemic patient, reduce the risk of fluid overload, reduce the risk of the injudicious use of vasopressors and inotropes, and improve clinical outcomes.In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 757 Westwood Plaza, Suite 2231, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

ABSTRACT
Accurate assessments of intravascular fluid status are an essential part of perioperative care and necessary in the management of the hemodynamically unstable patient. Goal-directed fluid management can facilitate resuscitation of the hypovolemic patient, reduce the risk of fluid overload, reduce the risk of the injudicious use of vasopressors and inotropes, and improve clinical outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus