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The Equivocal Relationship Between Territoriality and Scent Marking in Wild Saddleback Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis).

Lledo-Ferrer Y, Peláez F, Heymann EW - Int. J. Primatol. (2011)

Bottom Line: None of the predictions were confirmed.It appears that instead of defending a territory in the classic sense, the tamarins are optimizing signal transmission by depositing their scents where the probability of detection by neighbors is higher.ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10764-011-9516-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Researchers have often assumed that scent marking serves a territorial function in callitrichines, although some controversy exists. To fulfill such a function, scent marks should 1) prevent intrusions, 2) ensure access to feeding resources, 3) enable avoidance of intergroup encounters, or 4) play an important role in the aggressive encounters between groups. We studied 13 saddleback tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis) belonging to 3 free-ranging groups, which formed mixed-species troops with moustached tamarins (S. mystax) in the Amazonian rain forest of Peru. None of the predictions were confirmed. The tamarins used a border-marking strategy, marking more on the periphery of their territory. However, feeding trees in overlap and encounter areas received more scent marking but were still visited by neighboring groups. Intergroup encounters occurred more often than expected, and scent-marking frequency was not higher during them than when no other group was present. It appears that instead of defending a territory in the classic sense, the tamarins are optimizing signal transmission by depositing their scents where the probability of detection by neighbors is higher. Saddleback tamarins may use shared areas of their home ranges to exchange information with neighboring groups, perhaps regarding reproductive opportunities. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10764-011-9516-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Home ranges of the focal groups and overlap areas.
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Fig1: Home ranges of the focal groups and overlap areas.

Mentions: The focal groups differed in home-range size and in the proportion of home-range overlap (Table III, Fig. 1). Group 1 had the smallest home range and shared 50% of it with neighbors, whereas group 2 had the largest home range but shared only 21%.Table III


The Equivocal Relationship Between Territoriality and Scent Marking in Wild Saddleback Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis).

Lledo-Ferrer Y, Peláez F, Heymann EW - Int. J. Primatol. (2011)

Home ranges of the focal groups and overlap areas.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139874&req=5

Fig1: Home ranges of the focal groups and overlap areas.
Mentions: The focal groups differed in home-range size and in the proportion of home-range overlap (Table III, Fig. 1). Group 1 had the smallest home range and shared 50% of it with neighbors, whereas group 2 had the largest home range but shared only 21%.Table III

Bottom Line: None of the predictions were confirmed.It appears that instead of defending a territory in the classic sense, the tamarins are optimizing signal transmission by depositing their scents where the probability of detection by neighbors is higher.ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10764-011-9516-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Researchers have often assumed that scent marking serves a territorial function in callitrichines, although some controversy exists. To fulfill such a function, scent marks should 1) prevent intrusions, 2) ensure access to feeding resources, 3) enable avoidance of intergroup encounters, or 4) play an important role in the aggressive encounters between groups. We studied 13 saddleback tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis) belonging to 3 free-ranging groups, which formed mixed-species troops with moustached tamarins (S. mystax) in the Amazonian rain forest of Peru. None of the predictions were confirmed. The tamarins used a border-marking strategy, marking more on the periphery of their territory. However, feeding trees in overlap and encounter areas received more scent marking but were still visited by neighboring groups. Intergroup encounters occurred more often than expected, and scent-marking frequency was not higher during them than when no other group was present. It appears that instead of defending a territory in the classic sense, the tamarins are optimizing signal transmission by depositing their scents where the probability of detection by neighbors is higher. Saddleback tamarins may use shared areas of their home ranges to exchange information with neighboring groups, perhaps regarding reproductive opportunities. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10764-011-9516-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus