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The impact of fructose on renal function and blood pressure.

Kretowicz M, Johnson RJ, Ishimoto T, Nakagawa T, Manitius J - Int J Nephrol (2011)

Bottom Line: Fructose is a sugar present in sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, and fruits.Fructose intake has increased markedly in the last two centuries, primarily due to increased intake of added sugars.These studies suggest that excessive intake of fructose might have an etiologic role in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and cardiorenal disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Hypertension and Internal Medicine, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, ul. Skłodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Fructose is a sugar present in sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, and fruits. Fructose intake has increased markedly in the last two centuries, primarily due to increased intake of added sugars. Increasing evidence suggests that the excessive intake of fructose may induce fatty liver, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and kidney disease. These studies suggest that excessive intake of fructose might have an etiologic role in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and cardiorenal disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mechanisms of kidney dysfunction in fructose-induced hypertension.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Mechanisms of kidney dysfunction in fructose-induced hypertension.

Mentions: Fructose and sucrose are also known to induce renal hypertrophy and tubulointerstitial disease in rats [10, 45, 46]. The mechanism may involve two central pathways (Figure 2). First, the rise in uric acid in response to uric acid may cause an afferent arteriolopathy resulting in glomerular hypertension [40]. Second, fructose may also be filtered into the urine where it is taken up in the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, leading to local intracellular generation of uric acid with oxidative stress and local inflammation [8].


The impact of fructose on renal function and blood pressure.

Kretowicz M, Johnson RJ, Ishimoto T, Nakagawa T, Manitius J - Int J Nephrol (2011)

Mechanisms of kidney dysfunction in fructose-induced hypertension.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139867&req=5

fig2: Mechanisms of kidney dysfunction in fructose-induced hypertension.
Mentions: Fructose and sucrose are also known to induce renal hypertrophy and tubulointerstitial disease in rats [10, 45, 46]. The mechanism may involve two central pathways (Figure 2). First, the rise in uric acid in response to uric acid may cause an afferent arteriolopathy resulting in glomerular hypertension [40]. Second, fructose may also be filtered into the urine where it is taken up in the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, leading to local intracellular generation of uric acid with oxidative stress and local inflammation [8].

Bottom Line: Fructose is a sugar present in sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, and fruits.Fructose intake has increased markedly in the last two centuries, primarily due to increased intake of added sugars.These studies suggest that excessive intake of fructose might have an etiologic role in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and cardiorenal disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Hypertension and Internal Medicine, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, ul. Skłodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Fructose is a sugar present in sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, and fruits. Fructose intake has increased markedly in the last two centuries, primarily due to increased intake of added sugars. Increasing evidence suggests that the excessive intake of fructose may induce fatty liver, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and kidney disease. These studies suggest that excessive intake of fructose might have an etiologic role in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and cardiorenal disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus