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Multiple method contraception use among African American adolescents in four US cities.

Brown JL, Hennessy M, Sales JM, DiClemente RJ, Salazar LF, Vanable PA, Carey MP, Romer D, Valois RF, Brown LK, Stanton B - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2011)

Bottom Line: Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select "safe" sexual partners. 40% endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported.Perceived ability to select "safe" partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25), using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23), or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50).Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Behavioral Sciences & Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. jennifer.brown@emory.edu

ABSTRACT
We report on African American adolescents' (N = 850; M age = 15.4) contraceptive practices and type of contraception utilized during their last sexual encounter. Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select "safe" sexual partners. 40% endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported. Perceived ability to select "safe" partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25), using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23), or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50). Female gender predicted hormonal birth control use (OR = 2.33), use of less effective contraceptive methods (e.g., withdrawal; OR = 2.47), and using no contraception (OR = 2.37). Respondents' age and partner type did not predict contraception use. Adolescents used contraceptive methods with limited ability to prevent both unintended pregnancies and STD/HIV. Adolescents who believed their partners posed low risk were more likely to use contraceptive practices other than condoms or no contraception. Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

Show MeSH
Tetrachoric correlations between contraceptive methods (N = 850). Note: significance level of correlation below coefficient.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Tetrachoric correlations between contraceptive methods (N = 850). Note: significance level of correlation below coefficient.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the (tetrachoric) correlations between use of each method. The statistically significant dual methods were condoms/birth control pills, condoms/rhythm, condoms/withdrawal, withdrawal/rhythm, and other method/rhythm. However, even these significant correlations understate the variety of contraceptive use: 35 different contraceptive method combinations were reported by this adolescent sample (not counting the 12%, n = 99, who reported “no method used” at the last vaginal sex event). The most frequent combination was condoms/withdrawal (11%, n = 92), followed by condom/birth control pills (7%, n = 58), condom/birth control pills/withdrawal (4%, n = 31), condom/withdrawal/rhythm (3.5%, n = 30), and condom/rhythm (3.4%, n = 29). The most frequent method used alone was condoms (35%, n = 294), but single use of any of the other methods was rare: the next most recent single use was withdrawal (9%, n = 76) followed by birth control pill (<2%, n = 16). In other words, except for exclusive use of the male condom, virtually all contraceptive methods were dual or multiple in this sample.


Multiple method contraception use among African American adolescents in four US cities.

Brown JL, Hennessy M, Sales JM, DiClemente RJ, Salazar LF, Vanable PA, Carey MP, Romer D, Valois RF, Brown LK, Stanton B - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2011)

Tetrachoric correlations between contraceptive methods (N = 850). Note: significance level of correlation below coefficient.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139861&req=5

fig2: Tetrachoric correlations between contraceptive methods (N = 850). Note: significance level of correlation below coefficient.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the (tetrachoric) correlations between use of each method. The statistically significant dual methods were condoms/birth control pills, condoms/rhythm, condoms/withdrawal, withdrawal/rhythm, and other method/rhythm. However, even these significant correlations understate the variety of contraceptive use: 35 different contraceptive method combinations were reported by this adolescent sample (not counting the 12%, n = 99, who reported “no method used” at the last vaginal sex event). The most frequent combination was condoms/withdrawal (11%, n = 92), followed by condom/birth control pills (7%, n = 58), condom/birth control pills/withdrawal (4%, n = 31), condom/withdrawal/rhythm (3.5%, n = 30), and condom/rhythm (3.4%, n = 29). The most frequent method used alone was condoms (35%, n = 294), but single use of any of the other methods was rare: the next most recent single use was withdrawal (9%, n = 76) followed by birth control pill (<2%, n = 16). In other words, except for exclusive use of the male condom, virtually all contraceptive methods were dual or multiple in this sample.

Bottom Line: Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select "safe" sexual partners. 40% endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported.Perceived ability to select "safe" partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25), using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23), or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50).Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Behavioral Sciences & Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. jennifer.brown@emory.edu

ABSTRACT
We report on African American adolescents' (N = 850; M age = 15.4) contraceptive practices and type of contraception utilized during their last sexual encounter. Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select "safe" sexual partners. 40% endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported. Perceived ability to select "safe" partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25), using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23), or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50). Female gender predicted hormonal birth control use (OR = 2.33), use of less effective contraceptive methods (e.g., withdrawal; OR = 2.47), and using no contraception (OR = 2.37). Respondents' age and partner type did not predict contraception use. Adolescents used contraceptive methods with limited ability to prevent both unintended pregnancies and STD/HIV. Adolescents who believed their partners posed low risk were more likely to use contraceptive practices other than condoms or no contraception. Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

Show MeSH