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Monoterpene variation mediated attack preference evolution of the bark beetle Dendroctonus valens.

Liu Z, Wang B, Xu B, Sun J - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Moreover, large-DBH pine trees provided more spacious habitat and contained more nutrients, such as nitrogen, than did small-DBH pine trees, which benefited RTBs' fecundity and larval development.RTBs seem to have evolved mechanisms to locate those large hosts that will allow them to maximize their fitness.Monoterpene variation mediated attack preference implies the potential for the management of RTB.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Beijing, China. liuzdqyj@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Several studies suggest that some bark beetle like to attack large trees. The invasive red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte, one of the most destructive forest pests in China, is known to exhibit this behavior. Our previous study demonstrated that RTBs preferred to attack large-diameter trees (diameter at breast height, DBH ≥30 cm) over small-diameter trees (DBH ≤10 cm) in the field. In the current study, we studied the attacking behavior and the underlying mechanisms in the laboratory. Behavioral assays showed that RTBs preferred the bark of large-DBH trees and had a higher attack rate on the bolts of these trees. Y-tube assays showed that RTBs preferred the volatiles released by large-DBH trees to those released by small-DBH trees. Subsequent analysis revealed that both large- and small-DBH trees had the same composition of monoterpenes, but the concentration of each component differed; thus it appeared that the concentrations acted as cues for RTBs to locate the right-sized host which was confirmed by further behavioral assays. Moreover, large-DBH pine trees provided more spacious habitat and contained more nutrients, such as nitrogen, than did small-DBH pine trees, which benefited RTBs' fecundity and larval development. RTBs seem to have evolved mechanisms to locate those large hosts that will allow them to maximize their fitness. Monoterpene variation mediated attack preference implies the potential for the management of RTB.

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Quantitative variation in monoterpenes of large and small trees of Chinese pine P. tabulaeformis.
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pone-0022005-g001: Quantitative variation in monoterpenes of large and small trees of Chinese pine P. tabulaeformis.

Mentions: Analysis of volatiles by GC-MS showed that for both sizes of host trees, the components of the bark did not differ qualitatively according to the composition of monoterpenes (Fig. 1). There were, however, significant differences in the quantitative monoterpene profiles of the different tree sizes. α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene and limonene were main components of volatiles for both large and small-DBH pine trees. Blends A and B, mixed with main components by their estimated natural proportions, elicited significantly different responses from the beetles (Table 2): blend A (produced by large trees) was more attractive than blend B (produced by small trees).


Monoterpene variation mediated attack preference evolution of the bark beetle Dendroctonus valens.

Liu Z, Wang B, Xu B, Sun J - PLoS ONE (2011)

Quantitative variation in monoterpenes of large and small trees of Chinese pine P. tabulaeformis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3139614&req=5

pone-0022005-g001: Quantitative variation in monoterpenes of large and small trees of Chinese pine P. tabulaeformis.
Mentions: Analysis of volatiles by GC-MS showed that for both sizes of host trees, the components of the bark did not differ qualitatively according to the composition of monoterpenes (Fig. 1). There were, however, significant differences in the quantitative monoterpene profiles of the different tree sizes. α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene and limonene were main components of volatiles for both large and small-DBH pine trees. Blends A and B, mixed with main components by their estimated natural proportions, elicited significantly different responses from the beetles (Table 2): blend A (produced by large trees) was more attractive than blend B (produced by small trees).

Bottom Line: Moreover, large-DBH pine trees provided more spacious habitat and contained more nutrients, such as nitrogen, than did small-DBH pine trees, which benefited RTBs' fecundity and larval development.RTBs seem to have evolved mechanisms to locate those large hosts that will allow them to maximize their fitness.Monoterpene variation mediated attack preference implies the potential for the management of RTB.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Beijing, China. liuzdqyj@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Several studies suggest that some bark beetle like to attack large trees. The invasive red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte, one of the most destructive forest pests in China, is known to exhibit this behavior. Our previous study demonstrated that RTBs preferred to attack large-diameter trees (diameter at breast height, DBH ≥30 cm) over small-diameter trees (DBH ≤10 cm) in the field. In the current study, we studied the attacking behavior and the underlying mechanisms in the laboratory. Behavioral assays showed that RTBs preferred the bark of large-DBH trees and had a higher attack rate on the bolts of these trees. Y-tube assays showed that RTBs preferred the volatiles released by large-DBH trees to those released by small-DBH trees. Subsequent analysis revealed that both large- and small-DBH trees had the same composition of monoterpenes, but the concentration of each component differed; thus it appeared that the concentrations acted as cues for RTBs to locate the right-sized host which was confirmed by further behavioral assays. Moreover, large-DBH pine trees provided more spacious habitat and contained more nutrients, such as nitrogen, than did small-DBH pine trees, which benefited RTBs' fecundity and larval development. RTBs seem to have evolved mechanisms to locate those large hosts that will allow them to maximize their fitness. Monoterpene variation mediated attack preference implies the potential for the management of RTB.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus