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Visual recovery and predictors of visual prognosis after managing traumatic cataracts in 555 patients.

Shah M, Shah S, Shah S, Prasad V, Parikh A - Indian J Ophthalmol (2011 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: Six weeks postoperatively, the visual acuity in the operated eye was >20/60 in 193 (48%) and 49 (29%) eyes in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.002, ANOVA).At follow-up, >20/60 vision was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 0.85-3.02).Overall 242 (43.5%) eyes gained a final visual acuity of >20/60.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Drashti Netralaya, Dahod, Gujarat, India. omtrust@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim was to evaluate the visual recovery after managing traumatic cataracts and determine the predictors of a better visual prognosis.

Materials and methods: This was a prospective study. We enrolled patients with specific inclusion criteria, examined their eyes to review the comorbidities due to trauma, performed surgery for traumatic cataracts, and implanted lenses. The patients were reexamined 6 weeks postoperatively. We divided the cases of traumatic cataract into two groups, the "open globe" (Group 1) and "closed globe" (Group 2) groups, according to the ocular trauma based on the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System (BETTS) and compared the determinants of visual acuity.

Results: Our cohort of 555 eyes with traumatic cataracts included 394 eyes in Group 1 and 161 in Group 2. Six weeks postoperatively, the visual acuity in the operated eye was >20/60 in 193 (48%) and 49 (29%) eyes in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.002, ANOVA). At follow-up, >20/60 vision was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 0.85-3.02). Overall 242 (43.5%) eyes gained a final visual acuity of >20/60.

Conclusions: Open globe injury has a favorable prognosis for satisfactory (>20/60) visual recovery after the management of traumatic cataracts.

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Relationship between pre- and posttreatment visual acuity
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Figure 3: Relationship between pre- and posttreatment visual acuity

Mentions: We analyzed several demographic factors, including patient entry (P = 0.4); socioeconomic status, 83% were from poor class; and residence, 94% lived in rural area and none had a significant relationship with the final visual acuity, according to cross-tabulation and statistical tests. The object causing the injury [Table 1; P = 0.3] and the activity at the time of the injury [Table 2; P = 0.3] were also not significantly associated with satisfactory final visual acuity. A wooden stick was the most common agent of injury (56.3%). A comparison of the pre- and postoperative visual acuity showed that treatment significantly improved visual acuity [Table 3; Pearson's χ2test, P <0.001; ANOVA, P = 0.001] [Fig. 3] An intraocular lens was implanted in 453 (81.6%) cases. Aspiration was significantly associated with improved visual acuity (P <0.001) and was performed using one or two ports in 48.6% of the patients in Group 1. Injury to a structure of the eye in addition to the lens was identified in 514 of the 555 patients [Table 4]. The probable reason for no improvement in vision was comorbidity [Table 5].Postoperative vision was compared according to the type of injury. Primary posterior capsulectomy and anterior vitrectomy, commonly performed for eyes with significant inflammation, resulted in a significant improvement in the final visual acuity [Table 6; P <0.001].


Visual recovery and predictors of visual prognosis after managing traumatic cataracts in 555 patients.

Shah M, Shah S, Shah S, Prasad V, Parikh A - Indian J Ophthalmol (2011 May-Jun)

Relationship between pre- and posttreatment visual acuity
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3120243&req=5

Figure 3: Relationship between pre- and posttreatment visual acuity
Mentions: We analyzed several demographic factors, including patient entry (P = 0.4); socioeconomic status, 83% were from poor class; and residence, 94% lived in rural area and none had a significant relationship with the final visual acuity, according to cross-tabulation and statistical tests. The object causing the injury [Table 1; P = 0.3] and the activity at the time of the injury [Table 2; P = 0.3] were also not significantly associated with satisfactory final visual acuity. A wooden stick was the most common agent of injury (56.3%). A comparison of the pre- and postoperative visual acuity showed that treatment significantly improved visual acuity [Table 3; Pearson's χ2test, P <0.001; ANOVA, P = 0.001] [Fig. 3] An intraocular lens was implanted in 453 (81.6%) cases. Aspiration was significantly associated with improved visual acuity (P <0.001) and was performed using one or two ports in 48.6% of the patients in Group 1. Injury to a structure of the eye in addition to the lens was identified in 514 of the 555 patients [Table 4]. The probable reason for no improvement in vision was comorbidity [Table 5].Postoperative vision was compared according to the type of injury. Primary posterior capsulectomy and anterior vitrectomy, commonly performed for eyes with significant inflammation, resulted in a significant improvement in the final visual acuity [Table 6; P <0.001].

Bottom Line: Six weeks postoperatively, the visual acuity in the operated eye was >20/60 in 193 (48%) and 49 (29%) eyes in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.002, ANOVA).At follow-up, >20/60 vision was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 0.85-3.02).Overall 242 (43.5%) eyes gained a final visual acuity of >20/60.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Drashti Netralaya, Dahod, Gujarat, India. omtrust@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim was to evaluate the visual recovery after managing traumatic cataracts and determine the predictors of a better visual prognosis.

Materials and methods: This was a prospective study. We enrolled patients with specific inclusion criteria, examined their eyes to review the comorbidities due to trauma, performed surgery for traumatic cataracts, and implanted lenses. The patients were reexamined 6 weeks postoperatively. We divided the cases of traumatic cataract into two groups, the "open globe" (Group 1) and "closed globe" (Group 2) groups, according to the ocular trauma based on the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System (BETTS) and compared the determinants of visual acuity.

Results: Our cohort of 555 eyes with traumatic cataracts included 394 eyes in Group 1 and 161 in Group 2. Six weeks postoperatively, the visual acuity in the operated eye was >20/60 in 193 (48%) and 49 (29%) eyes in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.002, ANOVA). At follow-up, >20/60 vision was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 0.85-3.02). Overall 242 (43.5%) eyes gained a final visual acuity of >20/60.

Conclusions: Open globe injury has a favorable prognosis for satisfactory (>20/60) visual recovery after the management of traumatic cataracts.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus