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Long-term and recent progress in blood pressure levels among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes, 1988-2008.

Wang J, Geiss LS, Cheng YJ, Imperatore G, Saydah SH, James C, Gregg EW - Diabetes Care (2011)

Bottom Line: Between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008, there were no significant changes in BP levels.BP levels among adults with diabetes improved between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008, but the progress stalled between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008.The lack of improvement among young adults is concerning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Diabetes Translation, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. zrr4@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine whether there were long-term (between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008) and recent (between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008) changes in blood pressure (BP) levels among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes.

Research design and methods: Using data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), we examined changes in BP distributions, mean BPs, and proportion with BP<140/90 mmHg.

Results: Between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008, for adults with diabetes, mean BPs decreased from 135/72 mmHg to 131/69 mmHg (P<0.01) and the proportion with BP<140/90 mmHg increased from 64 to 69% (P=0.01). Although hypertension prevalence increased, hypertension awareness, treatment, and control improved. However, there was no evidence of improvement for adults 20-44 years old. Between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008, there were no significant changes in BP levels.

Conclusions: BP levels among adults with diabetes improved between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008, but the progress stalled between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008. The lack of improvement among young adults is concerning.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted (*) BP distributions for U.S. adults with diabetes, 1988–1994 vs. 2001–2008.
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Figure 1: Adjusted (*) BP distributions for U.S. adults with diabetes, 1988–1994 vs. 2001–2008.

Mentions: Figure 1 depicts shifts in both SBP and DBP distributions toward lower levels between 1988–1994 and 2001–2008. However, only a small percentage in either period had DBP ≥90 mmHg.


Long-term and recent progress in blood pressure levels among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes, 1988-2008.

Wang J, Geiss LS, Cheng YJ, Imperatore G, Saydah SH, James C, Gregg EW - Diabetes Care (2011)

Adjusted (*) BP distributions for U.S. adults with diabetes, 1988–1994 vs. 2001–2008.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3120172&req=5

Figure 1: Adjusted (*) BP distributions for U.S. adults with diabetes, 1988–1994 vs. 2001–2008.
Mentions: Figure 1 depicts shifts in both SBP and DBP distributions toward lower levels between 1988–1994 and 2001–2008. However, only a small percentage in either period had DBP ≥90 mmHg.

Bottom Line: Between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008, there were no significant changes in BP levels.BP levels among adults with diabetes improved between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008, but the progress stalled between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008.The lack of improvement among young adults is concerning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Diabetes Translation, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. zrr4@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine whether there were long-term (between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008) and recent (between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008) changes in blood pressure (BP) levels among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes.

Research design and methods: Using data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), we examined changes in BP distributions, mean BPs, and proportion with BP<140/90 mmHg.

Results: Between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008, for adults with diabetes, mean BPs decreased from 135/72 mmHg to 131/69 mmHg (P<0.01) and the proportion with BP<140/90 mmHg increased from 64 to 69% (P=0.01). Although hypertension prevalence increased, hypertension awareness, treatment, and control improved. However, there was no evidence of improvement for adults 20-44 years old. Between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008, there were no significant changes in BP levels.

Conclusions: BP levels among adults with diabetes improved between 1988-1994 and 2001-2008, but the progress stalled between 2001-2004 and 2005-2008. The lack of improvement among young adults is concerning.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus