Limits...
Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades.

Andersen F, Douglas NM, Bustos D, Galappaththy G, Qi G, Hsiang MS, Kusriastuti R, Mendis K, Taleo G, Whittaker M, Price RN, von Seidlein L - Malar. J. (2011)

Bottom Line: The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741) of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p < 0.001) in 2009.The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing.The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Quantitative data are lacking on published malaria research. The purpose of the study is to characterize trends in malaria-related literature from 1990 to 2009 in 11 Asian-Pacific countries that are committed to malaria elimination as a national goal.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 1990 to December 2009 in PubMed/MEDLINE using terms for malaria and 11 target countries (Bhutan, China, North Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vanuatu). The references were collated and categorized according to subject, Plasmodium species, and whether they contained original or derivative data.

Results: 2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2009 related to malaria in the target countries. The annual output of malaria-related papers increased linearly whereas the overall biomedical output from these countries grew exponentially. The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741) of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p < 0.001) in 2009. Thailand had the highest absolute output of malaria-related papers (n = 1211), followed by China (n = 609) and Indonesia (n = 346). Solomon Islands and Vanuatu had lower absolute numbers of publications, but both countries had the highest number of publications per capita (1.3 and 2.5 papers/1,000 population). The largest percentage of papers concerned the epidemiology and control of malaria (53%) followed by studies of drugs and drug resistance (47%). There was an increase in the proportion of articles relating to epidemiology, entomology, biology, molecular biology, pathophysiology and diagnostics from the first to the second decade, whereas the percentage of papers on drugs, clinical aspects of malaria, immunology, and social sciences decreased.

Conclusions: The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing. The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount. In addition the elimination of malaria will require operational research to implement and scale up interventions.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of malaria-related articles by topic, 1990-1999 and 2000-2009.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3118956&req=5

Figure 5: Percentage of malaria-related articles by topic, 1990-1999 and 2000-2009.

Mentions: Publications were categorized into 10 subjects and charted for the first and second decades of the study; Figure 5. The epidemiology and control of malaria accounted for 53% (1,183/2,222) of publications, followed by drugs and drug resistance (47% 1,032/2,222; p < 0.001)). Between the first and second decade there was an increase in the proportion of articles on epidemiology (1.15 fold; p < 0.001), entomology (1.24 fold; p < 0.001), biology, molecular biology, pathophysiology and diagnostics. In contrast there was a decrease in the proportion of papers on immunology (0.67; p < 0.001), clinical aspects of malaria (0.78 fold; p < 0.001), drugs (0.95 fold; p = 0.3), and social sciences (0.91; p = 0.4).


Trends in malaria research in 11 Asian Pacific countries: an analysis of peer-reviewed publications over two decades.

Andersen F, Douglas NM, Bustos D, Galappaththy G, Qi G, Hsiang MS, Kusriastuti R, Mendis K, Taleo G, Whittaker M, Price RN, von Seidlein L - Malar. J. (2011)

Percentage of malaria-related articles by topic, 1990-1999 and 2000-2009.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3118956&req=5

Figure 5: Percentage of malaria-related articles by topic, 1990-1999 and 2000-2009.
Mentions: Publications were categorized into 10 subjects and charted for the first and second decades of the study; Figure 5. The epidemiology and control of malaria accounted for 53% (1,183/2,222) of publications, followed by drugs and drug resistance (47% 1,032/2,222; p < 0.001)). Between the first and second decade there was an increase in the proportion of articles on epidemiology (1.15 fold; p < 0.001), entomology (1.24 fold; p < 0.001), biology, molecular biology, pathophysiology and diagnostics. In contrast there was a decrease in the proportion of papers on immunology (0.67; p < 0.001), clinical aspects of malaria (0.78 fold; p < 0.001), drugs (0.95 fold; p = 0.3), and social sciences (0.91; p = 0.4).

Bottom Line: The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741) of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p < 0.001) in 2009.The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing.The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Quantitative data are lacking on published malaria research. The purpose of the study is to characterize trends in malaria-related literature from 1990 to 2009 in 11 Asian-Pacific countries that are committed to malaria elimination as a national goal.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 1990 to December 2009 in PubMed/MEDLINE using terms for malaria and 11 target countries (Bhutan, China, North Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vanuatu). The references were collated and categorized according to subject, Plasmodium species, and whether they contained original or derivative data.

Results: 2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2009 related to malaria in the target countries. The annual output of malaria-related papers increased linearly whereas the overall biomedical output from these countries grew exponentially. The percentage of malaria-related publications was nearly 3% (111/3741) of all biomedical publications in 1992 and decreased to less than 1% (118/12171; p < 0.001) in 2009. Thailand had the highest absolute output of malaria-related papers (n = 1211), followed by China (n = 609) and Indonesia (n = 346). Solomon Islands and Vanuatu had lower absolute numbers of publications, but both countries had the highest number of publications per capita (1.3 and 2.5 papers/1,000 population). The largest percentage of papers concerned the epidemiology and control of malaria (53%) followed by studies of drugs and drug resistance (47%). There was an increase in the proportion of articles relating to epidemiology, entomology, biology, molecular biology, pathophysiology and diagnostics from the first to the second decade, whereas the percentage of papers on drugs, clinical aspects of malaria, immunology, and social sciences decreased.

Conclusions: The proportion of malaria-related publications out of the overall biomedical output from the 11 target Asian-Pacific countries is decreasing. The discovery and evaluation of new, safe and effective drugs and vaccines is paramount. In addition the elimination of malaria will require operational research to implement and scale up interventions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus