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Survey mode effects on valuation of environmental goods.

Bell J, Huber J, Viscusi WK - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams.The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses.The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. jbb@duke.edu

ABSTRACT
This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams. Four different modes are compared: bringing respondents to one central location after phone recruitment, mall intercepts in two states, national phone-mail survey, and an Internet survey with a national, probability-based panel. The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses. The article also shows that the estimated value of water quality can differ substantially depending on the survey mode. The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest.

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Text of water quality definition in survey.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f1-ijerph-08-01222: Text of water quality definition in survey.

Mentions: The survey used in this analysis focuses on the value of water quality for inland water—lakes, rivers, and streams. Specifically, the survey elicited the monetary value of lake and river quality in a respondent’s region. These dimensions, shown in Figure 1, reflect the water quality dimensions used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its National Water Quality Inventory, a measure of water quality conditions in the United States (this document can be found on the EPA website at http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/guidance/cwa/305b/index.cfm).


Survey mode effects on valuation of environmental goods.

Bell J, Huber J, Viscusi WK - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Text of water quality definition in survey.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3118886&req=5

f1-ijerph-08-01222: Text of water quality definition in survey.
Mentions: The survey used in this analysis focuses on the value of water quality for inland water—lakes, rivers, and streams. Specifically, the survey elicited the monetary value of lake and river quality in a respondent’s region. These dimensions, shown in Figure 1, reflect the water quality dimensions used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its National Water Quality Inventory, a measure of water quality conditions in the United States (this document can be found on the EPA website at http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/guidance/cwa/305b/index.cfm).

Bottom Line: This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams.The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses.The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. jbb@duke.edu

ABSTRACT
This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams. Four different modes are compared: bringing respondents to one central location after phone recruitment, mall intercepts in two states, national phone-mail survey, and an Internet survey with a national, probability-based panel. The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses. The article also shows that the estimated value of water quality can differ substantially depending on the survey mode. The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest.

Show MeSH