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An optimal centralized carbon dioxide repository for Florida, USA.

Poiencot B, Brown C - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: For over a decade, the United States Department of Energy, and engineers, geologists, and scientists from all over the world have investigated the potential for reducing atmospheric carbon emissions through carbon sequestration.Further analysis of the subsurface geology in these general locations will provide insight into the suitability of the subsurface conditions and the available capacity for carbon sequestration at selected possible repository sites.The identification of the most favorable site(s) is also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, University of North Florida, Building 50, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. Brandon.poiencot@unf.edu

ABSTRACT
For over a decade, the United States Department of Energy, and engineers, geologists, and scientists from all over the world have investigated the potential for reducing atmospheric carbon emissions through carbon sequestration. Numerous reports exist analyzing the potential for sequestering carbon dioxide at various sites around the globe, but none have identified the potential for a statewide system in Florida, USA. In 2005, 83% of Florida's electrical energy was produced by natural gas, coal, or oil (e.g., fossil fuels), from power plants spread across the state. In addition, only limited research has been completed on evaluating optimal pipeline transportation networks to centralized carbon dioxide repositories. This paper describes the feasibility and preliminary locations for an optimal centralized Florida-wide carbon sequestration repository. Linear programming optimization modeling is used to plan and route an idealized pipeline network to existing Florida power plants. Further analysis of the subsurface geology in these general locations will provide insight into the suitability of the subsurface conditions and the available capacity for carbon sequestration at selected possible repository sites. The identification of the most favorable site(s) is also presented.

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Location of 40 largest CO2 sources and 5 potential CCS repositories in Florida.
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f1-ijerph-08-00955: Location of 40 largest CO2 sources and 5 potential CCS repositories in Florida.

Mentions: The first task in developing an optimal CO2 pipeline transportation network for Florida, is to identify the location and magnitude of the largest sources of CO2 within the state. Florida has approximately 136 primary sources of CO2 inventoried by the EPA. For the initial model development effort, the 40 largest sources of CO2 were identified and summarized [3]. These 40 sources comprise over 90% of the 2005 total CO2 emissions for Florida. The 40 sources along with a map identification number, location in UTM 1983 (meters) horizontal grid coordinates, and the respective annual CO2 emissions are listed in Table 1. Each of the 40 sources is also shown on Figure 1 along with 5 potential CO2 repositories discussed later in this paper.


An optimal centralized carbon dioxide repository for Florida, USA.

Poiencot B, Brown C - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Location of 40 largest CO2 sources and 5 potential CCS repositories in Florida.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3118873&req=5

f1-ijerph-08-00955: Location of 40 largest CO2 sources and 5 potential CCS repositories in Florida.
Mentions: The first task in developing an optimal CO2 pipeline transportation network for Florida, is to identify the location and magnitude of the largest sources of CO2 within the state. Florida has approximately 136 primary sources of CO2 inventoried by the EPA. For the initial model development effort, the 40 largest sources of CO2 were identified and summarized [3]. These 40 sources comprise over 90% of the 2005 total CO2 emissions for Florida. The 40 sources along with a map identification number, location in UTM 1983 (meters) horizontal grid coordinates, and the respective annual CO2 emissions are listed in Table 1. Each of the 40 sources is also shown on Figure 1 along with 5 potential CO2 repositories discussed later in this paper.

Bottom Line: For over a decade, the United States Department of Energy, and engineers, geologists, and scientists from all over the world have investigated the potential for reducing atmospheric carbon emissions through carbon sequestration.Further analysis of the subsurface geology in these general locations will provide insight into the suitability of the subsurface conditions and the available capacity for carbon sequestration at selected possible repository sites.The identification of the most favorable site(s) is also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, University of North Florida, Building 50, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. Brandon.poiencot@unf.edu

ABSTRACT
For over a decade, the United States Department of Energy, and engineers, geologists, and scientists from all over the world have investigated the potential for reducing atmospheric carbon emissions through carbon sequestration. Numerous reports exist analyzing the potential for sequestering carbon dioxide at various sites around the globe, but none have identified the potential for a statewide system in Florida, USA. In 2005, 83% of Florida's electrical energy was produced by natural gas, coal, or oil (e.g., fossil fuels), from power plants spread across the state. In addition, only limited research has been completed on evaluating optimal pipeline transportation networks to centralized carbon dioxide repositories. This paper describes the feasibility and preliminary locations for an optimal centralized Florida-wide carbon sequestration repository. Linear programming optimization modeling is used to plan and route an idealized pipeline network to existing Florida power plants. Further analysis of the subsurface geology in these general locations will provide insight into the suitability of the subsurface conditions and the available capacity for carbon sequestration at selected possible repository sites. The identification of the most favorable site(s) is also presented.

Show MeSH