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Priming global and local processing of composite faces: revisiting the processing-bias effect on face perception.

Gao Z, Flevaris AV, Robertson LC, Bentin S - Atten Percept Psychophys (2011)

Bottom Line: We used the composite-face illusion and Navon stimuli to determine the consequences of priming local or global processing on subsequent face recognition.Local processing of Navon stimuli did not influence the sensitivity to incongruence.We conclude that global processing of Navon stimuli augments holistic processing of the face.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91905, Israel.

ABSTRACT
We used the composite-face illusion and Navon stimuli to determine the consequences of priming local or global processing on subsequent face recognition. The composite-face illusion reflects the difficulty of ignoring the task-irrelevant half-face while attending the task-relevant half if the half-faces in the composite are aligned. On each trial, participants first matched two Navon stimuli, attending to either the global or the local level, and then matched the upper halves of two composite faces presented sequentially. Global processing of Navon stimuli increased the sensitivity to incongruence between the upper and the lower halves of the composite face, relative to a baseline in which the composite faces were not primed. Local processing of Navon stimuli did not influence the sensitivity to incongruence. Although incongruence induced a bias toward different responses, this bias was not modulated by priming. We conclude that global processing of Navon stimuli augments holistic processing of the face.

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Examples of a Navon letters used in the present study and b aligned and misaligned composite faces used in the present study
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Fig1: Examples of a Navon letters used in the present study and b aligned and misaligned composite faces used in the present study

Mentions: The Navon stimuli consisted of black letters presented on a gray background. Each local letter was 0.85 cm wide × 1.14 cm high (0.7°  ×  0.9°); the local letters were spatially arranged on a 5  ×  5 grid to form a global letter that was 5.8 cm wide × 6 cm high (4.7°  ×  4.9°). The letters were black Helvetica bold font D, E, F, and H in all their local and global combinations, making 16 distinct Navon stimuli (Fig. 1a).Fig. 1


Priming global and local processing of composite faces: revisiting the processing-bias effect on face perception.

Gao Z, Flevaris AV, Robertson LC, Bentin S - Atten Percept Psychophys (2011)

Examples of a Navon letters used in the present study and b aligned and misaligned composite faces used in the present study
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3118009&req=5

Fig1: Examples of a Navon letters used in the present study and b aligned and misaligned composite faces used in the present study
Mentions: The Navon stimuli consisted of black letters presented on a gray background. Each local letter was 0.85 cm wide × 1.14 cm high (0.7°  ×  0.9°); the local letters were spatially arranged on a 5  ×  5 grid to form a global letter that was 5.8 cm wide × 6 cm high (4.7°  ×  4.9°). The letters were black Helvetica bold font D, E, F, and H in all their local and global combinations, making 16 distinct Navon stimuli (Fig. 1a).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We used the composite-face illusion and Navon stimuli to determine the consequences of priming local or global processing on subsequent face recognition.Local processing of Navon stimuli did not influence the sensitivity to incongruence.We conclude that global processing of Navon stimuli augments holistic processing of the face.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91905, Israel.

ABSTRACT
We used the composite-face illusion and Navon stimuli to determine the consequences of priming local or global processing on subsequent face recognition. The composite-face illusion reflects the difficulty of ignoring the task-irrelevant half-face while attending the task-relevant half if the half-faces in the composite are aligned. On each trial, participants first matched two Navon stimuli, attending to either the global or the local level, and then matched the upper halves of two composite faces presented sequentially. Global processing of Navon stimuli increased the sensitivity to incongruence between the upper and the lower halves of the composite face, relative to a baseline in which the composite faces were not primed. Local processing of Navon stimuli did not influence the sensitivity to incongruence. Although incongruence induced a bias toward different responses, this bias was not modulated by priming. We conclude that global processing of Navon stimuli augments holistic processing of the face.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus