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Exhaled nitric oxide and urinary EPX levels in infants: a pilot study.

Carlstedt F, Lazowska D, Bornehag CG, Olin AC, Hasselgren M - Clin Mol Allergy (2011)

Bottom Line: FeNO levels were reduced in infants with a history of upper respiratory symptoms during the previous two weeks (p < 0.002).FeNO levels in infants were associated to windowpane condensation.In a major population study, however, the method is difficult to use, for practical reasons.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Care Research Centre, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden. fredrik.carlstedt@liv.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Objective markers of early airway inflammation in infants are not established but are of great interest in a scientific setting. Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and urinary eosinophilic protein X (uEPX) are a two such interesting markers.

Objective: To investigate the feasibility of measuring FeNO and uEPX in infants and their mothers and to determine if any relations between these two variables and environmental factors can be seen in a small sample size. This was conducted as a pilot study for the ongoing Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and child Asthma and allergy study (SELMA).

Methods: Consecutive infants between two and six months old and their mothers at children's health care centres were invited, and 110 mother-infant pairs participated. FeNO and uEPX were analysed in both mothers and infants. FeNO was analyzed in the mothers online by the use of the handheld Niox Mino device and in the infants offline from exhaled air sampled during tidal breathing. A 33-question multiple-choice questionnaire that dealt with symptoms of allergic disease, heredity, and housing characteristics was used.

Results: FeNO levels were reduced in infants with a history of upper respiratory symptoms during the previous two weeks (p < 0.002). There was a trend towards higher FeNO levels in infants with windowpane condensation in the home (p < 0.05). There was no association between uEPX in the infants and the other studied variables.

Conclusion: The use of uEPX as a marker of early inflammation was not supported. FeNO levels in infants were associated to windowpane condensation. Measuring FeNO by the present method may be an interesting way of evaluating early airway inflammation. In a major population study, however, the method is difficult to use, for practical reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported occurrence of windowpane condensation in the living room and FeNO levels in the infants, circles indicate outliers.
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Figure 2: Reported occurrence of windowpane condensation in the living room and FeNO levels in the infants, circles indicate outliers.

Mentions: As seen in table 3, there was a trend towards higher FeNO levels in infants with parent-reported windowpane condensation in the living room (p < 0.05, figure 2), in the parents' bedroom (p = 0.06), and in the infant's bedroom (p = 0.10). Moreover, there was a trend towards lower FeNO-levels in infants from larger homes (p = 0.07, r2 = -0.2).


Exhaled nitric oxide and urinary EPX levels in infants: a pilot study.

Carlstedt F, Lazowska D, Bornehag CG, Olin AC, Hasselgren M - Clin Mol Allergy (2011)

Reported occurrence of windowpane condensation in the living room and FeNO levels in the infants, circles indicate outliers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117812&req=5

Figure 2: Reported occurrence of windowpane condensation in the living room and FeNO levels in the infants, circles indicate outliers.
Mentions: As seen in table 3, there was a trend towards higher FeNO levels in infants with parent-reported windowpane condensation in the living room (p < 0.05, figure 2), in the parents' bedroom (p = 0.06), and in the infant's bedroom (p = 0.10). Moreover, there was a trend towards lower FeNO-levels in infants from larger homes (p = 0.07, r2 = -0.2).

Bottom Line: FeNO levels were reduced in infants with a history of upper respiratory symptoms during the previous two weeks (p < 0.002).FeNO levels in infants were associated to windowpane condensation.In a major population study, however, the method is difficult to use, for practical reasons.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Primary Care Research Centre, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden. fredrik.carlstedt@liv.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Objective markers of early airway inflammation in infants are not established but are of great interest in a scientific setting. Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and urinary eosinophilic protein X (uEPX) are a two such interesting markers.

Objective: To investigate the feasibility of measuring FeNO and uEPX in infants and their mothers and to determine if any relations between these two variables and environmental factors can be seen in a small sample size. This was conducted as a pilot study for the ongoing Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and child Asthma and allergy study (SELMA).

Methods: Consecutive infants between two and six months old and their mothers at children's health care centres were invited, and 110 mother-infant pairs participated. FeNO and uEPX were analysed in both mothers and infants. FeNO was analyzed in the mothers online by the use of the handheld Niox Mino device and in the infants offline from exhaled air sampled during tidal breathing. A 33-question multiple-choice questionnaire that dealt with symptoms of allergic disease, heredity, and housing characteristics was used.

Results: FeNO levels were reduced in infants with a history of upper respiratory symptoms during the previous two weeks (p < 0.002). There was a trend towards higher FeNO levels in infants with windowpane condensation in the home (p < 0.05). There was no association between uEPX in the infants and the other studied variables.

Conclusion: The use of uEPX as a marker of early inflammation was not supported. FeNO levels in infants were associated to windowpane condensation. Measuring FeNO by the present method may be an interesting way of evaluating early airway inflammation. In a major population study, however, the method is difficult to use, for practical reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus