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Fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplant.

Li Q, Zhang Q, Wang C, Tang C, Zhang Y, Li N, Li J - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp.In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function.Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The intestinal chronic rejection (CR) is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity.

Methods/principal findings: The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions.

Conclusions/significance: Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Dendrogram derived from DGGE analysis based on UPGMA clustering algorithm.The scale shown here represents percentage similarity between DGGE profiles.
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pone-0020460-g002: Dendrogram derived from DGGE analysis based on UPGMA clustering algorithm.The scale shown here represents percentage similarity between DGGE profiles.

Mentions: To characterize gut microbiota shifts in CR rats and determine the effects of fish oil on the restoration of gut microbiota after allogeneic transplantation, we performed a global survey of the microbiota in intestinal contents and mucosal samples from the grafted intestine, recipients' native ileum and colon at day 190 posttransplant. Genetic fingerprints of the intestinal bacterial communities generated by PCR-DGGE analysis showed shifts of the bacterial composition and diversity in luminal contents (Figure 1) and intestinal mucosa (Figure 3) during chronic rejection after intestinal transplantation. As shown in Figure 2, the similarity indices of luminal microbiota in graft and host's ileum of each group ranged from 71% to 84%, indicating higher similarity in gut microbiota in transplanted intestines and native ileum of CR rats. Clustering analysis based on the similarity indices showed that Syn group clustered together with normal group and FO group, and PBS group and CO group clustered in another branch. It indicated that the microbial composition in the graft and host's ileum lumen had a significant variation during chronic rejection after intestinal transplantation. The luminal microbiota in FO-fed animals was closer to those in Syn and normal control rats (54% and 59%, respectively), which revealed the effects of fish oil on the recovery of intestinal luminal microbiota after allogeneic transplantation. The DGGE fingerprint showed that the band number from the colon contents was much larger than those of the graft and ileal luminal samples, indicating an increasing bacterial diversity. The microbial composition in the colonic contents was different from that in the graft and ileal luminal samples, which clustered in a single branch. The variation of the luminal microbiota in the colon was almost consistent with those in the grafted intestine and host's ileum in different groups. In FO group, the DGGE profile of the luminal microbiota in the colon was also similar to that of Syn group and normal group.


Fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplant.

Li Q, Zhang Q, Wang C, Tang C, Zhang Y, Li N, Li J - PLoS ONE (2011)

Dendrogram derived from DGGE analysis based on UPGMA clustering algorithm.The scale shown here represents percentage similarity between DGGE profiles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117781&req=5

pone-0020460-g002: Dendrogram derived from DGGE analysis based on UPGMA clustering algorithm.The scale shown here represents percentage similarity between DGGE profiles.
Mentions: To characterize gut microbiota shifts in CR rats and determine the effects of fish oil on the restoration of gut microbiota after allogeneic transplantation, we performed a global survey of the microbiota in intestinal contents and mucosal samples from the grafted intestine, recipients' native ileum and colon at day 190 posttransplant. Genetic fingerprints of the intestinal bacterial communities generated by PCR-DGGE analysis showed shifts of the bacterial composition and diversity in luminal contents (Figure 1) and intestinal mucosa (Figure 3) during chronic rejection after intestinal transplantation. As shown in Figure 2, the similarity indices of luminal microbiota in graft and host's ileum of each group ranged from 71% to 84%, indicating higher similarity in gut microbiota in transplanted intestines and native ileum of CR rats. Clustering analysis based on the similarity indices showed that Syn group clustered together with normal group and FO group, and PBS group and CO group clustered in another branch. It indicated that the microbial composition in the graft and host's ileum lumen had a significant variation during chronic rejection after intestinal transplantation. The luminal microbiota in FO-fed animals was closer to those in Syn and normal control rats (54% and 59%, respectively), which revealed the effects of fish oil on the recovery of intestinal luminal microbiota after allogeneic transplantation. The DGGE fingerprint showed that the band number from the colon contents was much larger than those of the graft and ileal luminal samples, indicating an increasing bacterial diversity. The microbial composition in the colonic contents was different from that in the graft and ileal luminal samples, which clustered in a single branch. The variation of the luminal microbiota in the colon was almost consistent with those in the grafted intestine and host's ileum in different groups. In FO group, the DGGE profile of the luminal microbiota in the colon was also similar to that of Syn group and normal group.

Bottom Line: Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp.In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function.Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The intestinal chronic rejection (CR) is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity.

Methods/principal findings: The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions.

Conclusions/significance: Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus