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System Integration - A Major Step toward Lab on a Chip.

Sin ML, Gao J, Liao JC, Wong PK - J Biol Eng (2011)

Bottom Line: It is increasingly realized that an effective system integration strategy that is low cost and broadly applicable to various biological engineering situations is required to fully realize the potential of microfluidics.In this article, we review several promising system integration approaches for microfluidics and discuss their advantages, limitations, and applications.Future advancements of these microfluidic strategies will lead toward translational lab-on-a-chip systems for a wide spectrum of biological engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. pak@email.arizona.edu.

ABSTRACT
Microfluidics holds great promise to revolutionize various areas of biological engineering, such as single cell analysis, environmental monitoring, regenerative medicine, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite the fact that intensive efforts have been devoted into the field in the past decades, microfluidics has not yet been adopted widely. It is increasingly realized that an effective system integration strategy that is low cost and broadly applicable to various biological engineering situations is required to fully realize the potential of microfluidics. In this article, we review several promising system integration approaches for microfluidics and discuss their advantages, limitations, and applications. Future advancements of these microfluidic strategies will lead toward translational lab-on-a-chip systems for a wide spectrum of biological engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.


Characteristics of different microfluidics platforms. Comparisons of key selection criteria for different microfluidic system integration strategies. The properties include portability, the number of samples analyzed in a single assay (throughput), the cost of the instrument, the number of parameters tested for each sample (multiplexity), variety of microfluidic operations (diversity), accuracy, and the flexibility to comply different microfluidic operations without making a new chip (programmability). The higher the rating implies the better performance of the platform in the specific property.
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Figure 9: Characteristics of different microfluidics platforms. Comparisons of key selection criteria for different microfluidic system integration strategies. The properties include portability, the number of samples analyzed in a single assay (throughput), the cost of the instrument, the number of parameters tested for each sample (multiplexity), variety of microfluidic operations (diversity), accuracy, and the flexibility to comply different microfluidic operations without making a new chip (programmability). The higher the rating implies the better performance of the platform in the specific property.

Mentions: Recently, microfluidic researchers have devoted a large amount of effort to develop microfluidic platforms from a system-oriented rather than components-oriented perspective. Not only can they provide a set of basic microfluidic operating procedures but also allow easy interface of these fluidic operation modules. Each platform possesses its own strengths and weaknesses in terms of several general quality criteria for the realization of lab-on-a-chip (Figure 9). These important characteristics include portability, the number of samples that can be analyzed in a single assay (throughput), the cost of the instrument, the number of parameters tested for each sample (multiplexity), variety of microfluidic operations (diversity), accuracy, and the flexibility to implement complex microfluidic operations for different applications (programmability). The importance of these criteria depends on the specific application being considered and the list of criteria can serve as a general guideline for the selection of a microfluidic system integration strategy.


System Integration - A Major Step toward Lab on a Chip.

Sin ML, Gao J, Liao JC, Wong PK - J Biol Eng (2011)

Characteristics of different microfluidics platforms. Comparisons of key selection criteria for different microfluidic system integration strategies. The properties include portability, the number of samples analyzed in a single assay (throughput), the cost of the instrument, the number of parameters tested for each sample (multiplexity), variety of microfluidic operations (diversity), accuracy, and the flexibility to comply different microfluidic operations without making a new chip (programmability). The higher the rating implies the better performance of the platform in the specific property.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117764&req=5

Figure 9: Characteristics of different microfluidics platforms. Comparisons of key selection criteria for different microfluidic system integration strategies. The properties include portability, the number of samples analyzed in a single assay (throughput), the cost of the instrument, the number of parameters tested for each sample (multiplexity), variety of microfluidic operations (diversity), accuracy, and the flexibility to comply different microfluidic operations without making a new chip (programmability). The higher the rating implies the better performance of the platform in the specific property.
Mentions: Recently, microfluidic researchers have devoted a large amount of effort to develop microfluidic platforms from a system-oriented rather than components-oriented perspective. Not only can they provide a set of basic microfluidic operating procedures but also allow easy interface of these fluidic operation modules. Each platform possesses its own strengths and weaknesses in terms of several general quality criteria for the realization of lab-on-a-chip (Figure 9). These important characteristics include portability, the number of samples that can be analyzed in a single assay (throughput), the cost of the instrument, the number of parameters tested for each sample (multiplexity), variety of microfluidic operations (diversity), accuracy, and the flexibility to implement complex microfluidic operations for different applications (programmability). The importance of these criteria depends on the specific application being considered and the list of criteria can serve as a general guideline for the selection of a microfluidic system integration strategy.

Bottom Line: It is increasingly realized that an effective system integration strategy that is low cost and broadly applicable to various biological engineering situations is required to fully realize the potential of microfluidics.In this article, we review several promising system integration approaches for microfluidics and discuss their advantages, limitations, and applications.Future advancements of these microfluidic strategies will lead toward translational lab-on-a-chip systems for a wide spectrum of biological engineering applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. pak@email.arizona.edu.

ABSTRACT
Microfluidics holds great promise to revolutionize various areas of biological engineering, such as single cell analysis, environmental monitoring, regenerative medicine, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite the fact that intensive efforts have been devoted into the field in the past decades, microfluidics has not yet been adopted widely. It is increasingly realized that an effective system integration strategy that is low cost and broadly applicable to various biological engineering situations is required to fully realize the potential of microfluidics. In this article, we review several promising system integration approaches for microfluidics and discuss their advantages, limitations, and applications. Future advancements of these microfluidic strategies will lead toward translational lab-on-a-chip systems for a wide spectrum of biological engineering applications.

No MeSH data available.