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Static stretching does not alter pre and post-landing muscle activation.

Moss WR, Feland JB, Hunter I, Hopkins JT - Sports Med Arthrosc Rehabil Ther Technol (2011)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to determine if static stretching has an effect on mean pre and postlanding muscle (vastus medialis VM, vastus lateralis VL, medial hamstring MH, and biceps femoris BF) activity. 26 healthy, physically active subjects were recruited, from which 13 completed a 14-day static stretching regimen for the quadriceps and hamstrings.Using the data from the force plate and EMG readings, a mean of EMG amplitude was calculated for 150 msec before and after landing.Static stretching may not impede dynamic stability of joints about which stretched muscles cross.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Research Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT. tyhopkins@byu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Static stretching may result in various strength and power deficiencies. Prior research has not determined, however, if static stretching causes a change in muscle activation during a functional task requiring dynamic stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if static stretching has an effect on mean pre and postlanding muscle (vastus medialis VM, vastus lateralis VL, medial hamstring MH, and biceps femoris BF) activity.

Methods: 26 healthy, physically active subjects were recruited, from which 13 completed a 14-day static stretching regimen for the quadriceps and hamstrings. Using the data from the force plate and EMG readings, a mean of EMG amplitude was calculated for 150 msec before and after landing. Each trial was normalized to an isometric reference position. Means were calculated for the VM, VL, MH, and BF from 5 trials in each session. Measures were collected pre, immediately following the 1st stretching session, and following 2 weeks of stretching.

Results: A 14-day static stretching regimen resulted in no significant differences in pre or postlanding mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing either acutely or over a 14-day period.

Conclusions: Static stretching, done acutely or over a 14-day period does not result in measurable differences of mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing. Static stretching may not impede dynamic stability of joints about which stretched muscles cross.

No MeSH data available.


Position of the subject during static stretching of the hamstrings. The left limb is being stretched.
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Figure 1: Position of the subject during static stretching of the hamstrings. The left limb is being stretched.

Mentions: The dominant leg of each subject was stretched from a standing position. The subject positioned him/herself near a table for aid in stabilization during stretching. Each subject positioned him/herself with the treatment leg approximately two feet in front of the opposite leg, and brought the chest toward the knee, while keeping their back straight and using the table for balance and to minimize stabilizing contraction of the hamstrings (Figure 1). In order to ensure a sufficient stretch, the subject kept the leg being stretched in a straight position and bent forward taking each stretch to a point of slight discomfort and holding that position.


Static stretching does not alter pre and post-landing muscle activation.

Moss WR, Feland JB, Hunter I, Hopkins JT - Sports Med Arthrosc Rehabil Ther Technol (2011)

Position of the subject during static stretching of the hamstrings. The left limb is being stretched.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117746&req=5

Figure 1: Position of the subject during static stretching of the hamstrings. The left limb is being stretched.
Mentions: The dominant leg of each subject was stretched from a standing position. The subject positioned him/herself near a table for aid in stabilization during stretching. Each subject positioned him/herself with the treatment leg approximately two feet in front of the opposite leg, and brought the chest toward the knee, while keeping their back straight and using the table for balance and to minimize stabilizing contraction of the hamstrings (Figure 1). In order to ensure a sufficient stretch, the subject kept the leg being stretched in a straight position and bent forward taking each stretch to a point of slight discomfort and holding that position.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to determine if static stretching has an effect on mean pre and postlanding muscle (vastus medialis VM, vastus lateralis VL, medial hamstring MH, and biceps femoris BF) activity. 26 healthy, physically active subjects were recruited, from which 13 completed a 14-day static stretching regimen for the quadriceps and hamstrings.Using the data from the force plate and EMG readings, a mean of EMG amplitude was calculated for 150 msec before and after landing.Static stretching may not impede dynamic stability of joints about which stretched muscles cross.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Research Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT. tyhopkins@byu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Static stretching may result in various strength and power deficiencies. Prior research has not determined, however, if static stretching causes a change in muscle activation during a functional task requiring dynamic stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if static stretching has an effect on mean pre and postlanding muscle (vastus medialis VM, vastus lateralis VL, medial hamstring MH, and biceps femoris BF) activity.

Methods: 26 healthy, physically active subjects were recruited, from which 13 completed a 14-day static stretching regimen for the quadriceps and hamstrings. Using the data from the force plate and EMG readings, a mean of EMG amplitude was calculated for 150 msec before and after landing. Each trial was normalized to an isometric reference position. Means were calculated for the VM, VL, MH, and BF from 5 trials in each session. Measures were collected pre, immediately following the 1st stretching session, and following 2 weeks of stretching.

Results: A 14-day static stretching regimen resulted in no significant differences in pre or postlanding mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing either acutely or over a 14-day period.

Conclusions: Static stretching, done acutely or over a 14-day period does not result in measurable differences of mean EMG amplitude during a drop landing. Static stretching may not impede dynamic stability of joints about which stretched muscles cross.

No MeSH data available.