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Emergent processes in cognitive-emotional interactions.

Pessoa L - Dialogues Clin Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: Within this framework, significant progress has been made in understanding specific aspects of behavior.First, anatomical evidence will be provided, focusing on structures such as hypothalamus, basal forebrain, amygdala, cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula.Data on functional interactions will then be discussed, followed by a discussion of a dual competition framework, which describes cognitive-emotional interactions in terms of perceptual and cognitive competition mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, 1101 E 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. lpessoa@indiana.edu

ABSTRACT
Emotion and cognition have been viewed as largely separate entities in the brain. Within this framework, significant progress has been made in understanding specific aspects of behavior. Research in the past two decades, however, has started to paint a different picture of brain organization, one in which network interactions are key to understanding complex behaviors. From both basic and clinical perspectives, the characterization of cognitive-emotional interactions constitutes a fundamental issue in the investigation of the mind and brain. This review will highlight the interactive and integrative potential that exists in the brain to bring together the cognitive and emotional domains. First, anatomical evidence will be provided, focusing on structures such as hypothalamus, basal forebrain, amygdala, cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula. Data on functional interactions will then be discussed, followed by a discussion of a dual competition framework, which describes cognitive-emotional interactions in terms of perceptual and cognitive competition mechanisms.

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Cognitive-emotional interactions. Affective value interacts with both perceptual and executive processes.
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DialoguesClinNeurosci-12-433-g002: Cognitive-emotional interactions. Affective value interacts with both perceptual and executive processes.

Mentions: The last two sections described both anatomical and functional evidence for the interaction between emotion and cognition. How do these interactions influence the flow of information processing in the brain?14,43,87,88 Several proposals have been advanced in the literature, focusing either on perceptual or cognitive processing. Here, the discussion of the previous sections is extended to further delineate how some of the brain regions discussed may contribute to cognitive-emotional interactions. The presentation refines and extends a conceptual framework described recently89 It was suggested that both emotion and motivation signals are integrated with perception and cognition so as to effectively incorporate value into the unfolding of behavior. The proposed framework was called the dual competition model to reflect the suggestion that affective significance influences competition at both the perceptual and executive levels (Figure 2) - and because the impact is due to both emotion and motivation, although the latter is not discussed here (but see ref 90).


Emergent processes in cognitive-emotional interactions.

Pessoa L - Dialogues Clin Neurosci (2010)

Cognitive-emotional interactions. Affective value interacts with both perceptual and executive processes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117594&req=5

DialoguesClinNeurosci-12-433-g002: Cognitive-emotional interactions. Affective value interacts with both perceptual and executive processes.
Mentions: The last two sections described both anatomical and functional evidence for the interaction between emotion and cognition. How do these interactions influence the flow of information processing in the brain?14,43,87,88 Several proposals have been advanced in the literature, focusing either on perceptual or cognitive processing. Here, the discussion of the previous sections is extended to further delineate how some of the brain regions discussed may contribute to cognitive-emotional interactions. The presentation refines and extends a conceptual framework described recently89 It was suggested that both emotion and motivation signals are integrated with perception and cognition so as to effectively incorporate value into the unfolding of behavior. The proposed framework was called the dual competition model to reflect the suggestion that affective significance influences competition at both the perceptual and executive levels (Figure 2) - and because the impact is due to both emotion and motivation, although the latter is not discussed here (but see ref 90).

Bottom Line: Within this framework, significant progress has been made in understanding specific aspects of behavior.First, anatomical evidence will be provided, focusing on structures such as hypothalamus, basal forebrain, amygdala, cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula.Data on functional interactions will then be discussed, followed by a discussion of a dual competition framework, which describes cognitive-emotional interactions in terms of perceptual and cognitive competition mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, 1101 E 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. lpessoa@indiana.edu

ABSTRACT
Emotion and cognition have been viewed as largely separate entities in the brain. Within this framework, significant progress has been made in understanding specific aspects of behavior. Research in the past two decades, however, has started to paint a different picture of brain organization, one in which network interactions are key to understanding complex behaviors. From both basic and clinical perspectives, the characterization of cognitive-emotional interactions constitutes a fundamental issue in the investigation of the mind and brain. This review will highlight the interactive and integrative potential that exists in the brain to bring together the cognitive and emotional domains. First, anatomical evidence will be provided, focusing on structures such as hypothalamus, basal forebrain, amygdala, cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula. Data on functional interactions will then be discussed, followed by a discussion of a dual competition framework, which describes cognitive-emotional interactions in terms of perceptual and cognitive competition mechanisms.

Show MeSH