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Putting together the pieces of polio: how Dorothy Horstmann helped solve the puzzle.

Carleton HA - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Dr. Dorothy Horstmann, epidemiologist, virologist, clinician, and educator, was the first woman appointed as a professor at the Yale School of Medicine.In 1961, she was appointed a professor at Yale School of Medicine, and in 1969, she became the first woman at Yale to receive an endowed chair, which was named in honor of her mentor, Dr. John Rodman Paul.In this review, the major scientific contributions of Dr. Dorothy Horstmann will be highlighted from her more than 50-year tenure at Yale School of Medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale School of Medicine, Boyer Center forMolecular Medicine, 295 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. heather.carleton@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
Dr. Dorothy Horstmann, epidemiologist, virologist, clinician, and educator, was the first woman appointed as a professor at the Yale School of Medicine. Horstmann made significant contributions to the fields of public health and virology, her most notable being the demonstration that poliovirus reached the central nervous system via the bloodstream, upsetting conventional wisdom and paving the way for polio vaccines. In 1961, she was appointed a professor at Yale School of Medicine, and in 1969, she became the first woman at Yale to receive an endowed chair, which was named in honor of her mentor, Dr. John Rodman Paul. In this review, the major scientific contributions of Dr. Dorothy Horstmann will be highlighted from her more than 50-year tenure at Yale School of Medicine.

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Dorothy Horstmann is pictured in her office at the Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory Building. Though Horstmann’s faculty appointment was in pediatrics and epidemiology, her office and laboratory were both located in the epidemiology department. Photo courtesy of Dr. I George Miller.
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Figure 1: Dorothy Horstmann is pictured in her office at the Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory Building. Though Horstmann’s faculty appointment was in pediatrics and epidemiology, her office and laboratory were both located in the epidemiology department. Photo courtesy of Dr. I George Miller.

Mentions: Yale hired Horstmann (Figure 1) in 1942 as a Commonwealth Fellow in Internal Medicine under the tutelage of Dr. John Rodman Paul. In 1931, together with Dr. James Trask and other Yale scientists, Paul started the Yale Poliomyelitis Study Unit to respond to the ever-increasing epidemics of polio [7]. Paul was a pioneer in the field of epidemiology and formed a new discipline called clinical epidemiology, which focused on “exploring the multiple factors contributing to the occurrence of disease in individuals and in population groups” [8]. Horstmann applied these techniques in her studies of poliovirus.


Putting together the pieces of polio: how Dorothy Horstmann helped solve the puzzle.

Carleton HA - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Dorothy Horstmann is pictured in her office at the Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory Building. Though Horstmann’s faculty appointment was in pediatrics and epidemiology, her office and laboratory were both located in the epidemiology department. Photo courtesy of Dr. I George Miller.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117421&req=5

Figure 1: Dorothy Horstmann is pictured in her office at the Epidemiology and Public Health Laboratory Building. Though Horstmann’s faculty appointment was in pediatrics and epidemiology, her office and laboratory were both located in the epidemiology department. Photo courtesy of Dr. I George Miller.
Mentions: Yale hired Horstmann (Figure 1) in 1942 as a Commonwealth Fellow in Internal Medicine under the tutelage of Dr. John Rodman Paul. In 1931, together with Dr. James Trask and other Yale scientists, Paul started the Yale Poliomyelitis Study Unit to respond to the ever-increasing epidemics of polio [7]. Paul was a pioneer in the field of epidemiology and formed a new discipline called clinical epidemiology, which focused on “exploring the multiple factors contributing to the occurrence of disease in individuals and in population groups” [8]. Horstmann applied these techniques in her studies of poliovirus.

Bottom Line: Dr. Dorothy Horstmann, epidemiologist, virologist, clinician, and educator, was the first woman appointed as a professor at the Yale School of Medicine.In 1961, she was appointed a professor at Yale School of Medicine, and in 1969, she became the first woman at Yale to receive an endowed chair, which was named in honor of her mentor, Dr. John Rodman Paul.In this review, the major scientific contributions of Dr. Dorothy Horstmann will be highlighted from her more than 50-year tenure at Yale School of Medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale School of Medicine, Boyer Center forMolecular Medicine, 295 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. heather.carleton@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
Dr. Dorothy Horstmann, epidemiologist, virologist, clinician, and educator, was the first woman appointed as a professor at the Yale School of Medicine. Horstmann made significant contributions to the fields of public health and virology, her most notable being the demonstration that poliovirus reached the central nervous system via the bloodstream, upsetting conventional wisdom and paving the way for polio vaccines. In 1961, she was appointed a professor at Yale School of Medicine, and in 1969, she became the first woman at Yale to receive an endowed chair, which was named in honor of her mentor, Dr. John Rodman Paul. In this review, the major scientific contributions of Dr. Dorothy Horstmann will be highlighted from her more than 50-year tenure at Yale School of Medicine.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus