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History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

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James E. Rothman 2008. Fergus F. Wallace Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Professor of Cell Biology, Professor of Chemistry, Chair of Cell Biology, 2008-present.
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Figure 20: James E. Rothman 2008. Fergus F. Wallace Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Professor of Cell Biology, Professor of Chemistry, Chair of Cell Biology, 2008-present.

Mentions: James Rothman (Figure 20) graduated summa cum laude from Yale College in 1971 with a degree in physics. He attended Harvard Medical School, but before completing his medical degree decided he wanted to pursue research in basic science. He earned a PhD in biological chemistry from Harvard in 1976. He then spent two years as a postdoctoral associate with Harvey F. Lodish at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1978, he took a position as an assistant professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. He was at Princeton University from 1988 to 1991. In 1991, he became the first chair of the Department of Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and vice-chair of the Sloan-Kettering Institute. He was Professor of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Biology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, and a foreign associate of the European Molecular Biology Association. He has received many honors, including the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2002. In 2010, he was awarded the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.


History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

James E. Rothman 2008. Fergus F. Wallace Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Professor of Cell Biology, Professor of Chemistry, Chair of Cell Biology, 2008-present.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117420&req=5

Figure 20: James E. Rothman 2008. Fergus F. Wallace Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Professor of Cell Biology, Professor of Chemistry, Chair of Cell Biology, 2008-present.
Mentions: James Rothman (Figure 20) graduated summa cum laude from Yale College in 1971 with a degree in physics. He attended Harvard Medical School, but before completing his medical degree decided he wanted to pursue research in basic science. He earned a PhD in biological chemistry from Harvard in 1976. He then spent two years as a postdoctoral associate with Harvey F. Lodish at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1978, he took a position as an assistant professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. He was at Princeton University from 1988 to 1991. In 1991, he became the first chair of the Department of Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and vice-chair of the Sloan-Kettering Institute. He was Professor of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Biology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, and a foreign associate of the European Molecular Biology Association. He has received many honors, including the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2002. In 2010, he was awarded the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

Show MeSH