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History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

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James D. Jamieson 1999. Professor of Cell Biology, Chair of Department of Cell Biology, 1973-present.
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Figure 16: James D. Jamieson 1999. Professor of Cell Biology, Chair of Department of Cell Biology, 1973-present.

Mentions: James D. Jamieson (1934- ) (Figure 16) received his MD from the University of British Columbia, Canada, in 1960. Following medical school, he moved to the Rockefeller University where he worked with George Palade on his PhD (1966), which concerned the “Intracellular Transport of Secretory Protein: Role of the Golgi Complex.” He stayed on at the Rockefeller, progressing to the rank of Associate Professor. In 1973, Dr. Jamieson joined Drs. Palade and Farquhar at Yale as Associate Professor. He was promoted to Professor of Cell Biology in 1975 and was the first chair of the Department of Cell Biology when the Section of Cell Biology became a department in 1983. He is currently Director of the MD-PhD Program [21]. His distinctions include president of the American Society for Cell Biology (1983) and Distinguished Achievement Award, American Gastroenterological Association (1993). Dr. Jamieson’s research interests have mainly focused on identification of components of the intracellular transport pathway in the pancreatic acinar cell as a model of a regulated secretory system.


History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010.

Lentz TL - Yale J Biol Med (2011)

James D. Jamieson 1999. Professor of Cell Biology, Chair of Department of Cell Biology, 1973-present.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3117420&req=5

Figure 16: James D. Jamieson 1999. Professor of Cell Biology, Chair of Department of Cell Biology, 1973-present.
Mentions: James D. Jamieson (1934- ) (Figure 16) received his MD from the University of British Columbia, Canada, in 1960. Following medical school, he moved to the Rockefeller University where he worked with George Palade on his PhD (1966), which concerned the “Intracellular Transport of Secretory Protein: Role of the Golgi Complex.” He stayed on at the Rockefeller, progressing to the rank of Associate Professor. In 1973, Dr. Jamieson joined Drs. Palade and Farquhar at Yale as Associate Professor. He was promoted to Professor of Cell Biology in 1975 and was the first chair of the Department of Cell Biology when the Section of Cell Biology became a department in 1983. He is currently Director of the MD-PhD Program [21]. His distinctions include president of the American Society for Cell Biology (1983) and Distinguished Achievement Award, American Gastroenterological Association (1993). Dr. Jamieson’s research interests have mainly focused on identification of components of the intracellular transport pathway in the pancreatic acinar cell as a model of a regulated secretory system.

Bottom Line: Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813.The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described.Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8002, USA. thomas.lentz@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

Show MeSH